Nominations are now open for the 2013 Albies

It’s now after Thanksgivukkah, which means it’s time to start garnering nominations for the 5th (5th!!) annual Albies, so named to honor of the great political economist Albert O. Hirschman. To reiterate the criteria for what merits an Albie nomination: I’m talking about any book, journal article, magazine piece, op-ed, or blog post published in ...

By , a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.

It's now after Thanksgivukkah, which means it's time to start garnering nominations for the 5th (5th!!) annual Albies, so named to honor of the great political economist Albert O. Hirschman.

To reiterate the criteria for what merits an Albie nomination:

I'm talking about any book, journal article, magazine piece, op-ed, or blog post published in the [last] calendar year that made you rethink how the world works in such a way that you will never be able "unthink" the argument.

It’s now after Thanksgivukkah, which means it’s time to start garnering nominations for the 5th (5th!!) annual Albies, so named to honor of the great political economist Albert O. Hirschman.

To reiterate the criteria for what merits an Albie nomination:

I’m talking about any book, journal article, magazine piece, op-ed, or blog post published in the [last] calendar year that made you rethink how the world works in such a way that you will never be able "unthink" the argument.

I’d make one amendment to that list, which is that video and audio presentations are also accepted.  After all, the films Up in the Air and Margin Call earned recognition in their respective years of release. 

This year was a pretty interesting one for the global political economy, which means it was a good year to write about it. So, please submit your ideas to me. And remember, this is the only year-end Top 10 list that could include both a prestigious university press book and a Business Insider blog post.  It’s that inclusive. Here are links to my 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012 lists for reference.

The winners will be announced, as is now tradition, on December 31st. In the meantime, readers are strongly encouraged to submit their nominations (with links if possible) in the comments.

Daniel W. Drezner is a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, where he is the co-director of the Russia and Eurasia Program. Twitter: @dandrezner

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