Foreign Policy

‘Better Fewer, but Better’

I heard a great line about public policy last week: "There are two things that people really hate. The first is change, and the second is the way things are." No doubt you’ve noticed the various changes that have been going on here at FP, as the site morphs and adapts and strives to improve ...

By , a columnist at Foreign Policy and the Robert and Renée Belfer professor of international relations at Harvard University.
Image: John Sutton/hgjohn/Flickr
Image: John Sutton/hgjohn/Flickr

I heard a great line about public policy last week: "There are two things that people really hate. The first is change, and the second is the way things are."

No doubt you’ve noticed the various changes that have been going on here at FP, as the site morphs and adapts and strives to improve over time. I’m happy to announce that my own role here is shifting slightly, from blogging whenever I could find the time to doing a regular once-a-week "column." I’m looking forward to the shift: Writing less frequently will allow me to be a bit more selective and probe some topics in more depth.

So if you’ve enjoyed my commentary over the past four years, don’t stop reading now. Vladimir Lenin was wrong about a lot of things, but his advice on revolutionary cadres applies even more to articles, books, and blog posts: "Better fewer, but better."

I heard a great line about public policy last week: "There are two things that people really hate. The first is change, and the second is the way things are."

No doubt you’ve noticed the various changes that have been going on here at FP, as the site morphs and adapts and strives to improve over time. I’m happy to announce that my own role here is shifting slightly, from blogging whenever I could find the time to doing a regular once-a-week "column." I’m looking forward to the shift: Writing less frequently will allow me to be a bit more selective and probe some topics in more depth.

So if you’ve enjoyed my commentary over the past four years, don’t stop reading now. Vladimir Lenin was wrong about a lot of things, but his advice on revolutionary cadres applies even more to articles, books, and blog posts: "Better fewer, but better."

Stephen M. Walt is a columnist at Foreign Policy and the Robert and Renée Belfer professor of international relations at Harvard University.

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