Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, January 6, 2014

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter: @FP_DemLab. In the latest of our Lab Reports on Kenya, Mwangi S. Kimenyi and Josephine Kibe explain the reasons behind the country’s remarkable economic success, while Alexander Noyes argues that Kenya’s security sector reforms haven’t received the credit they’re due. In 2013’s final Venezuela ...

TANG CHHIN SOTHY/AFP/Getty Images
TANG CHHIN SOTHY/AFP/Getty Images
TANG CHHIN SOTHY/AFP/Getty Images

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter: @FP_DemLab.

In the latest of our Lab Reports on Kenya, Mwangi S. Kimenyi and Josephine Kibe explain the reasons behind the country's remarkable economic success, while Alexander Noyes argues that Kenya's security sector reforms haven't received the credit they're due.

In 2013's final Venezuela Lab Report, Juan Nagel examines the first year of President Nicolás Maduro's brittle reign and the economic woes that could bring it crashing down.

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter: @FP_DemLab.

In the latest of our Lab Reports on Kenya, Mwangi S. Kimenyi and Josephine Kibe explain the reasons behind the country’s remarkable economic success, while Alexander Noyes argues that Kenya’s security sector reforms haven’t received the credit they’re due.

In 2013’s final Venezuela Lab Report, Juan Nagel examines the first year of President Nicolás Maduro’s brittle reign and the economic woes that could bring it crashing down.

Read all of Democracy Lab’s 2013 Lab Reports on Kenya, Venezuela, Ukraine, Libya, and Burma here.

Ken Roth reviews the year in human rights, and, despite significant setbacks, finds cause for optimism.

Anna Nemtsova looks on as U.S. Ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul unleashes his own brand of Twitter diplomacy.

James Kirchick explains why opponents of Russia’s "anti-gay propaganda" law should make the case that it’s bad for everyone, not just the LGBT community.

Mike Albertus and Victor Menaldo argue that South Africa’s ruling party must make fundamental changes if it wants to realize Nelson Mandela’s dream.

Mohamed Eljarh censures Libya’s transitional legislature for extending its mandate despite rising popular opposition to the move.

And now for this week’s recommended reads….

The Atlantic‘s Uri Friedman argues that even though more people will vote this year than ever before, 2014 will find democracy in retreat.

Writing for the American, Paul Wolfowitz makes the case that the past 50 years have seen the world become freer, safer, and richer. Everyone agreed? Please send your responses to us at @FP_DemLab or at democracylabfp@gmail.com.

David Kirkpatrick of The New York Times presents an in-depth report on the 2012 killing of U.S. Ambassador J. Christopher Stephens in Benghazi. Politico’s Blake Hounshell explains why the controversy over Stephens’ death in Washington is unlikely to abate anytime soon.

Writing for the Damascus Bureau, reporter Lina al-Hakim illuminates the difficulties facing journalists in Aleppo.

In the Financial Times, Victor Mallet and Joseph Allchin report on the standoff between Bangladesh’s ruling and opposition parties, who accuse one another of terrorism and corruption.

Devex’s Rolf Rosenkranz interviews philanthropist Tony Elumelu on his philosophy, "Africapitalism," which strives to deliver the goods of philanthropy with the efficacy of business.

On Jadaliyya, Elliott Colla investigates the willingness of Egypt’s literary intellectuals to condone violence — but only when its victims are Islamists.

In the New Republic, Michael Hobbes visits Zimbabwe and asks why prices are so high in such a poor country.

In the Cambodia Daily, Hui Reaksmey and Julia Wallace report on anti-Vietnamese violence perpetrated by anti-government demonstrators in Phnom Penh. (In the photo above, striking garment workers throw rocks during a clash with police in Cambodia.)

Twitter: @PrachiVidwans
Twitter: @ccaryl

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