Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, January 13, 2014

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter: @FP_DemLab. Christian Caryl looks at the prospects for global democracy in the year ahead. Asma Ghribi explains why Tunisia’s new constitution still poses major challenges to the freedom of religion and conscience. Mondher Ben Ayed argues that Tunisia can solidify its transition by reforming ...

JUAN BARRETO/AFP/Getty Images
JUAN BARRETO/AFP/Getty Images
JUAN BARRETO/AFP/Getty Images

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter: @FP_DemLab.

Christian Caryl looks at the prospects for global democracy in the year ahead.

Asma Ghribi explains why Tunisia's new constitution still poses major challenges to the freedom of religion and conscience.

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter: @FP_DemLab.

Christian Caryl looks at the prospects for global democracy in the year ahead.

Asma Ghribi explains why Tunisia’s new constitution still poses major challenges to the freedom of religion and conscience.

Mondher Ben Ayed argues that Tunisia can solidify its transition by reforming its shaky economy.

Javier Corrales examines the reign of Cuban President Raúl Castro after the 55th anniversary of the revolution.

Juan Nagel meditates on Venezuela’s soaring crime rates after the brutal murder of former beauty queen Mónica Spear shook the country. (In the photo above, anti-crime protesters release white balloons in Spear’s memory.)

Mohamed Eljarh explains how low voter registration numbers undermine the legitimacy of Libya’s transition process.

And now for this week’s recommended reads…

Victor Mallet of Financial Times sees trouble ahead for democracy in Asia — due in part to the fallout from the troubled election in Bangladesh. Newsweek‘s Balint Szlanko argues that democracy faces dispiriting prospects in the Middle East in 2014.

International Crisis Group warns that political violence is likely to break out in Thailand as anti-government protesters attempt to derail upcoming elections.

Democracy Digest presents a useful round-up of reporting in the run-up to Egypt’s constitutional referendum.

Writing for Syria Comment, Joshua Landis analyzes the new war between al Qaeda-affiliated jihadis and Syria’s other rebel militias.

On Al Jazeera, Mourad Teyeb offers a snapshot of the continuing political tug-of-war over Tunisia’s new constitution.

In a Freedom House report, Susan Booysen offers a look back at 20 years of South African democracy.

In Insight Turkey, A. Kadir Yildirim looks at the relationship between Egypt’s military and political Islam since the 2011 revolution.

The Guardian‘s Andy Fitzgerald challenges the West to speak out on the persecution of Saudi Arabia’s democratic activists.

Writing for the Atlantic, W. Bradford Wilcox argues that inequality isn’t as dangerous as everyone thinks.

Twitter: @PrachiVidwans
Twitter: @ccaryl

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