In Kiev, the Euromaidan Revolution Will Be Instagrammed

At least thirteen people died in Kiev in clashes between protesters and police Tuesday, making this the most violent day in Ukraine’s nearly three-month-long "Euromaidan" demonstrations against the policies of President Viktor Yanukovich.  The clashes on Tuesday came after a relative lull in the protests. On Monday, children played in Independence Square, which is known ...

SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP/Getty Images
SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP/Getty Images
SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP/Getty Images

At least thirteen people died in Kiev in clashes between protesters and police Tuesday, making this the most violent day in Ukraine's nearly three-month-long "Euromaidan" demonstrations against the policies of President Viktor Yanukovich. 

The clashes on Tuesday came after a relative lull in the protests. On Monday, children played in Independence Square, which is known in Ukraine as the Maidan, and vendors operated souvenir stands. But the standoff intensified after Russia announced Monday it would make another $2 billion available to Ukraine as part of a $15 billion loan program that has stoked anger among protesters, who see the deal as a move to draw Ukraine closer into Moscow's orbit. The situation grew violent as protesters marched on parliament Tuesday, touching off back and forth battles with police. Protesters in gas masks and makeshift riot gear rallied and threw stones. A video uploaded to Instagram shows riot police tossing Molotov cocktails from rooftops onto protesters. Barricades were set on fire, sending black plumes of smoke over the city.

The dramatic scenes on the streets of Kiev have been well-documented by traditional media, but also by the protesters on the ground, who have uploaded hundreds of photos of Tuesday's protests to Instagram. We've collected some of those images here using a geolocation tool developed by Chris Keller. This is what the last 24 hours have looked like through the eyes and iPhones of Kiev's protesters:

At least thirteen people died in Kiev in clashes between protesters and police Tuesday, making this the most violent day in Ukraine’s nearly three-month-long "Euromaidan" demonstrations against the policies of President Viktor Yanukovich. 

The clashes on Tuesday came after a relative lull in the protests. On Monday, children played in Independence Square, which is known in Ukraine as the Maidan, and vendors operated souvenir stands. But the standoff intensified after Russia announced Monday it would make another $2 billion available to Ukraine as part of a $15 billion loan program that has stoked anger among protesters, who see the deal as a move to draw Ukraine closer into Moscow’s orbit. The situation grew violent as protesters marched on parliament Tuesday, touching off back and forth battles with police. Protesters in gas masks and makeshift riot gear rallied and threw stones. A video uploaded to Instagram shows riot police tossing Molotov cocktails from rooftops onto protesters. Barricades were set on fire, sending black plumes of smoke over the city.

The dramatic scenes on the streets of Kiev have been well-documented by traditional media, but also by the protesters on the ground, who have uploaded hundreds of photos of Tuesday’s protests to Instagram. We’ve collected some of those images here using a geolocation tool developed by Chris Keller. This is what the last 24 hours have looked like through the eyes and iPhones of Kiev’s protesters:

J. Dana Stuster is a policy analyst at the National Security Network. Twitter: @jdanastuster

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