Best Defense

Thomas E. Ricks' daily take on national security.

The non-military nature of today’s news: Big change from how we’ve lived for years

Ukraine. Thailand. Venezuela. None of those civil disturbances are situations that might remotely engage the U.S. military, even if Putin gets all fraternal with his assistance to Ukraine. And Syria, while a war, isn’t something I think the U.S. military needs to worry much about getting involved in. Even Somalia, Yemen, North Korea, and Pakistan, ...

Wikimedia
Wikimedia

Ukraine. Thailand. Venezuela.

None of those civil disturbances are situations that might remotely engage the U.S. military, even if Putin gets all fraternal with his assistance to Ukraine. And Syria, while a war, isn’t something I think the U.S. military needs to worry much about getting involved in. Even Somalia, Yemen, North Korea, and Pakistan, the four horsemen of dependable messes, seem to be going through relatively quiet periods. Egypt, I dunno, but it also seems to be taking a timeout.

So, for the first time in about 13 years, I wake up each morning without expecting the overnight news to provide me something new to think about in terms of U.S. military action. This feels a bit weird to me — but also good.

On the other hand, no one is paying much attention to Cuba, but I wouldn’t be surprised to see a massive humanitarian problem there after the Castro regime falls, one that might well require South American troops helping distribute American-provided aid.

Meantime, enjoy the extra 15 minutes of sleep.

Ukraine. Thailand. Venezuela.

None of those civil disturbances are situations that might remotely engage the U.S. military, even if Putin gets all fraternal with his assistance to Ukraine. And Syria, while a war, isn’t something I think the U.S. military needs to worry much about getting involved in. Even Somalia, Yemen, North Korea, and Pakistan, the four horsemen of dependable messes, seem to be going through relatively quiet periods. Egypt, I dunno, but it also seems to be taking a timeout.

So, for the first time in about 13 years, I wake up each morning without expecting the overnight news to provide me something new to think about in terms of U.S. military action. This feels a bit weird to me — but also good.

On the other hand, no one is paying much attention to Cuba, but I wouldn’t be surprised to see a massive humanitarian problem there after the Castro regime falls, one that might well require South American troops helping distribute American-provided aid.

Meantime, enjoy the extra 15 minutes of sleep.

Thomas E. Ricks covered the U.S. military from 1991 to 2008 for the Wall Street Journal and then the Washington Post. He can be reached at ricksblogcomment@gmail.com. Twitter: @tomricks1

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