Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, March 31, 2014

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter: @FP_DemLab. Christian Caryl looks at the European Union’s decision to sanction a Russian propagandist. Hui Mei Liew Kaiser explains why Malaysians aren’t surprised by their government’s poor handling of information about missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. Min Zin outlines the bitter personal rivalries that ...

OLGA MALTSEVA/AFP/Getty Images
OLGA MALTSEVA/AFP/Getty Images
OLGA MALTSEVA/AFP/Getty Images

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter: @FP_DemLab.

Christian Caryl looks at the European Union's decision to sanction a Russian propagandist.

Hui Mei Liew Kaiser explains why Malaysians aren't surprised by their government's poor handling of information about missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter: @FP_DemLab.

Christian Caryl looks at the European Union’s decision to sanction a Russian propagandist.

Hui Mei Liew Kaiser explains why Malaysians aren’t surprised by their government’s poor handling of information about missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.

Min Zin outlines the bitter personal rivalries that threaten to push Burma into a political void.

Josh Cohen argues that a declaration of neutrality might be the best way for Ukraine to protect its independence.

Pavel Felgenhauer analyzes the strategic options facing Putin as he builds up his military forces along Ukraine’s frontier. (In the photo above, a stall sells masks of Putin and Ukrainian opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko in Sevastopol, Crimea.)

Juan Nagel reports on the continuing protests in Venezuela — and assesses their staying power.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

On Medium, Zeynep Tufekci reports on the Turkish government’s efforts to demonize social media. As part of the Carnegie Endowment’s new series on rising democracies, Senem Aydin-Duzgit and E. Fuat Keyman track Turkey’s democracy promotion efforts and its role in Turkish foreign policy.

Also writing for Carnegie, Michele Dunne and Scott Williamson crunch the data on Egypt’s slide into instability in the months since Mohamed Morsi’s ouster.

A new World Bank report explains how crony networks in Tunisia continue to thrive despite the demise of the dictatorship.

In a post for his blog Dart-Throwing Chimp, Jay Ulfelder explores the demographic conditions for democracy.

Writing for the Guardian, Jonathan Prentice proposes a possible compromise to resolve Thailand’s deepening political polarization.

In Foreign Policy, Catherine A. Traywick and John Hudson ask what Burma’s unraveling transition means for the reputation of former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Human Rights Watch maps the Syrian government’s barrel bomb attacks on its own citizens. Syria Deeply‘s Karen Leigh interviews experts about the escalating tension on the Turkey-Syria border in the wake of the Turkish military’s downing of a Syrian warplane.

Reuters correspondent Paul Taylor lists 10 ways the Ukraine crisis will change the world.

Twitter: @PrachiVidwans
Twitter: @ccaryl

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