U.S. Says Rescue Mission Less Likely in Northern Iraq

U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said that a rescue mission for members of Iraq’s minority Yazidi community is "far less likely now" after an assessment by Marines and Special Operations forces found that far fewer people are trapped on Mount Sinjar than expected. The Pentagon said U.S. airstrikes, humanitarian airdrops, and efforts by the Kurdish ...

AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images
AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images
AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said that a rescue mission for members of Iraq's minority Yazidi community is "far less likely now" after an assessment by Marines and Special Operations forces found that far fewer people are trapped on Mount Sinjar than expected. The Pentagon said U.S. airstrikes, humanitarian airdrops, and efforts by the Kurdish forces had enabled thousands of Yazidis to escape from the mountain where they had trapped after fleeing an advance by militants led by the Islamic State. However, Kurdish officials and Yazidi refugees reported that thousands of people still remain stranded on the mountain, mostly elderly, very young, or sick people. The United Nations has declared its highest level of emergency in Iraq hoping to mobilize resources to address the needs of the estimated 1.2 million Iraqis who have been internally displaced by recent violence. Meanwhile, in a dramatic shift from Germany's position of not sending weapons to conflict zones, a German official said if the current threat level persists in northern Iraq, Germany is prepared to supply arms to Kurdish forces.

Syria

The Syrian army and Hezbollah fighters have seized control of most of the Damascus suburb of Mleiha. Pro-government forces have waged an offensive over recent months against rebel fighters who were holding the strategic town, less than six miles from downtown Damascus located near the highway to the capital's airport. Meanwhile, the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons reported that all of the precursors for sarin gas that were removed from Syria have been destroyed on the U.S. ship, the Cape Ray. According to the OPCW, the vessel will now begin neutralizing 22 tons of sulphur mustard.

U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said that a rescue mission for members of Iraq’s minority Yazidi community is "far less likely now" after an assessment by Marines and Special Operations forces found that far fewer people are trapped on Mount Sinjar than expected. The Pentagon said U.S. airstrikes, humanitarian airdrops, and efforts by the Kurdish forces had enabled thousands of Yazidis to escape from the mountain where they had trapped after fleeing an advance by militants led by the Islamic State. However, Kurdish officials and Yazidi refugees reported that thousands of people still remain stranded on the mountain, mostly elderly, very young, or sick people. The United Nations has declared its highest level of emergency in Iraq hoping to mobilize resources to address the needs of the estimated 1.2 million Iraqis who have been internally displaced by recent violence. Meanwhile, in a dramatic shift from Germany’s position of not sending weapons to conflict zones, a German official said if the current threat level persists in northern Iraq, Germany is prepared to supply arms to Kurdish forces.

Syria

The Syrian army and Hezbollah fighters have seized control of most of the Damascus suburb of Mleiha. Pro-government forces have waged an offensive over recent months against rebel fighters who were holding the strategic town, less than six miles from downtown Damascus located near the highway to the capital’s airport. Meanwhile, the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons reported that all of the precursors for sarin gas that were removed from Syria have been destroyed on the U.S. ship, the Cape Ray. According to the OPCW, the vessel will now begin neutralizing 22 tons of sulphur mustard.

Headlines

  • Israeli and Palestinian negotiators have agreed to a renewed five-day cease-fire in order to continue Egyptian-mediated talks despite rocket fire and Israeli airstrikes Wednesday.
  • Giving his first televised court statement, ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak denied ordering the killings of protesters in 2011 in a retrial hearing Wednesday.
  • Egyptian security forces are breaking up protests of supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi who are marking the one-year anniversary of security forces’ killings of hundreds of demonstrators.
  • Saudi Arabia has donated $100 million to the United Nations to help combat terrorism, which U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said was timely with the emergence of the Islamic State. 

Arguments and Analysis

Maliki’s Search for Legitimacy‘ (Sajad Jiyad, Muftah)

"Even though the Federal Supreme Court reaffirmed its 2010 decree (on July 23 and August 11), there is still no legal or parliamentary procedure laying out how to definitively establish the largest political bloc. Technically, both SoL and the NA can claim to be the largest faction, since both have made statements to this effect. The issue is not resolved by counting MPs since SoL has already affirmed it is part of the NA and has not renounced its membership.

Maliki’s supporters have focused on the fact that they officially notified the temporary speaker during the first session of parliament that SoL is the largest bloc. According to them, Maliki is the proper head of this faction and therefore the only possible candidate for PM. In his televised comments on August 11, as well as in a letter to the president issued on the same day, Maliki argued that Masum had violated the constitution by nominating Abadi as prime minster. Describing the move as invalid and illegal, Maliki said, ‘the mistakes will be corrected,’ making clear he was unlikely to back down from his claim to the prime minister’s post."

Egypt Braces for Anniversary of Rabaa and Nahda Bloodshed‘ (Khaled Dawoud, Middle East Institute)

One key reason why Thursday’s demonstrations are likely to be more violent, compared to recent similar demonstrations marking significant 1st anniversary occasions for Brotherhood supporters, such as Morsi’s arrest on July 3, is not just the large number of deaths in Rabaa and Nahda a year ago, but the deep division that continues to mark the debate on what exactly happened on that day. For supporters of Sisi, the police attack against demonstrators was justified, considering that some of them were armed. And while some Brotherhood supporters exaggerate the number of their dead on that day, claiming between 3,000 to 6,000, their opponents insist that the number is around 600. Human Rights Watch reported that up to 1,000 were killed at both sit-ins in what it described as ‘the worse incident of mass unlawful killing in Egypt’s modern history.’

Obama mises the mark on Netanyahu‘ (Ben Caspit, Al Monitor)

"The fact that the president uses Netanyahu’s ‘high poll numbers’ to drive his point home highlights this lack of understanding. For an Israeli prime minister not to enjoy high approval ratings during war is unheard of, just like in the United States. The thing is that you need to gauge the prime minister’s approval ratings at the end of the war, not at its beginning or even in the middle. It is only when the dust settles and the outcome becomes apparent that the public starts digesting what went on and who won. Only then can the effects of the war be talked about.

Former Prime Minister Ehud Olmert started the Second Lebanon War in 2006 with an 88% approval rating in the polls, ending it, however, with merely 8%. Furthermore, sometimes it takes weeks or even months to determine whether the war was ‘good’ or ‘bad.’ So Netanyahu’s approval rating might be boosted by the polls at this stage, but these figures have no real validity."

— Mary Casey

<p>Mary Casey-Baker is the editor of Foreign Policy’s Middle East Daily Brief, as well as the assistant director of public affairs at the Project on Middle East Political Science and assistant editor of The Monkey Cage blog for the Washington Post. </p> Twitter: @casey_mary

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