Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, September 15, 2014

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Christian Caryl analyzes the politics of rage that drives both the Islamic State jihadists and the separatists in eastern Ukraine. Oliver Bullough argues that Ukraine won’t be able to solve its crippling corruption unless the West acknowledges its responsibility for the problem, ...

Omar Havana/Getty Images
Omar Havana/Getty Images
Omar Havana/Getty Images

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Christian Caryl analyzes the politics of rage that drives both the Islamic State jihadists and the separatists in eastern Ukraine.

Oliver Bullough argues that Ukraine won’t be able to solve its crippling corruption unless the West acknowledges its responsibility for the problem, too.

Asma Ghribi tracks the growing fears in Tunisia about jihadists returning home from fighting in Syria.

Michael Pollitt urges the British government to take its campaign against slavery to the next level.

Anna Nemtsova examines the dark legacy of a mass hostage-taking that left hundreds dead in Russia 10 years ago.

Christina Larson wonders whether Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen will follow through on his daring pledge to tackle the controversial issue of land rights. (The photo above shows a Cambodian monk meditating during a protest against the construction of a dam in Areng Valley.)

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

In Boston Review, Stephen Phelan reflects on the nature of Scottish nationalism ahead of this week’s independence vote.

International Crisis Group warns that violence is imminent in Yemen’s capital as extremists and tribesmen organize against the government. ICG also argues that the Syrian opposition is in urgent need of help as it faces off against both the government and the Islamic State (IS).

Writing for Monkey Cage, Elizabeth Ferris and Abbie Taylor assess the impact of IS on Iraq’s minorities. On the same blog, Tanisha M. Fazal rebuts the theory that wars will soon be a thing of the past.

Writing for Vanity Fair, Jeffrey E. Stern asks why no one saw West Africa’s Ebola epidemic coming.

The Guardian‘s Shaun Walker reports on one of Ukraine’s volunteer military units, and worries that their radicalism could stand in the way of post-conflict stability.

The Economist urges democratic countries to aid foreign NGOs in their fight against autocratic governments and restrictive regulation.

In the Irrawaddy, Nita Bhalla talks to Rohingya refugees that have fled to India to escape persecution in Burma.

Twitter: @PrachiVidwans
Twitter: @ccaryl

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows the Statue of Liberty holding a torch with other hands alongside hers as she lifts the flame, also resembling laurel, into place on the edge of the United Nations laurel logo.
An illustration shows the Statue of Liberty holding a torch with other hands alongside hers as she lifts the flame, also resembling laurel, into place on the edge of the United Nations laurel logo.

A New Multilateralism

How the United States can rejuvenate the global institutions it created.

A view from the cockpit shows backlit control panels and two pilots inside a KC-130J aerial refueler en route from Williamtown to Darwin as the sun sets on the horizon.
A view from the cockpit shows backlit control panels and two pilots inside a KC-130J aerial refueler en route from Williamtown to Darwin as the sun sets on the horizon.

America Prepares for a Pacific War With China It Doesn’t Want

Embedded with U.S. forces in the Pacific, I saw the dilemmas of deterrence firsthand.

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, seen in a suit and tie and in profile, walks outside the venue at the Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation. Behind him is a sculptural tree in a larger planter that appears to be leaning away from him.
Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, seen in a suit and tie and in profile, walks outside the venue at the Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation. Behind him is a sculptural tree in a larger planter that appears to be leaning away from him.

The Endless Frustration of Chinese Diplomacy

Beijing’s representatives are always scared they could be the next to vanish.

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan welcomes Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia Mohammed bin Salman during an official ceremony at the Presidential Complex in Ankara, on June 22, 2022.
Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan welcomes Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia Mohammed bin Salman during an official ceremony at the Presidential Complex in Ankara, on June 22, 2022.

The End of America’s Middle East

The region’s four major countries have all forfeited Washington’s trust.