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Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, October 14, 2014

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Peter Salisbury explains how Yemen’s rebel Houthi movement managed to seize control of the capital — and the country’s political fate. Doug Meigs and Michele Fan look at the music that animates Hong Kong’s pro-democracy protest. Berivan Orucoglu asks why ...

FETHI BELAID/AFP/Getty Images
FETHI BELAID/AFP/Getty Images

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Peter Salisbury explains how Yemen’s rebel Houthi movement managed to seize control of the capital — and the country’s political fate.

Doug Meigs and Michele Fan look at the music that animates Hong Kong’s pro-democracy protest.

Berivan Orucoglu asks why Turkey won’t strike back at the Islamic State.

Daniel Lansberg-Rodríguez reports on Venezuela’s latest defeats in the war on crime.

Asma Ghribi interviews Kalthoum Kennou, Tunisia’s only female candidate for president. (In the photo above, an unemployed man stands in front of campaign posters for the country’s parliamentary elections.)

And in the last of our series of Lab Reports on Brazil, Rob Dwyer warns that Brazil’s next president has to prioritize long-term economic reform.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

In the latest Journal of Democracy, Ivan Krastev argues that the world’s citizens feel let down by elections; Ghia Nodia untangles the relationship between geopolitical rivalries and democracy promotion; and Javier Corrales and Michael Penfold investigate whether lax presidential term limits will undermine Latin American democracy.

Slate‘s Anne Applebaum explains why autocrats have such a hard time accepting that protests are spontaneous and unpredictable.

In the Wall Street Journal, Peruvian economist Hernando de Soto argues that expanding economic opportunity is the best way to fight terrorist groups.

Writing for War on the Rocks, Lawrence Freedman examines Putin’s nimble tactics in the "limited war" in Ukraine.

Atlantic Council’s Barbara K. Bodine and Danya Greenfield offer a blueprint for a United States strategy in Yemen that focuses on strengthening the state and bolstering the economy.

The New York Times’ David D. Kirkpatrick reports on Egypt’s escalating repression on Cairo’s university campuses, where upwards of 91 students were arrested over the weekend. Also in the NYT, Elizabeth Pisani writes on the political interests at work behind moves to eliminate provincial elections in Indonesia.

On Monkey Cage, Megan A. Stewart asks why insurgent groups like the Islamic State spend so much money providing services like education and health care.

This week’s brief comes to you on a Tuesday due to a Monday holiday in the United States.

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