Burkina Faso Burning

Protests in the capital, Ouagadougou, are spinning out of control.

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Protesters pose with a police shield outside the parliament in Ouagadougou on October 30, 2014 as cars and documents burn outside. Hundreds of angry demonstrators in Burkina Faso stormed parliament on October 30 before setting it on fire in protest at plans to change the constitution to allow President Blaise Compaore to extend his 27-year rule. Police had fired tear gas on protesters to try to prevent them from moving in on the National Assembly building ahead of a vote on the controversial legislation. But about 1,500 people managed to break through the security cordon and were ransacking parliament. AFP PHOTO / ISSOUF SANOGO (Photo credit should read ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images)

On Thursday, hundreds of demonstrators stormed Burkina Faso's parliament to rail against a vote that would alter the constitution and allow President Blaise Compaore to extend his 27-year rule. The protests which are now in their third day, have become increasingly violent. The New York Times reports that soldiers are firing "live rounds and [using] tear gas to repel crowds seeking to storm the building." According to the BBC five people have died in the protests.

Above, protesters pose with a police shield outside parliament in Ouagadougou, Oct. 30.

On Thursday, hundreds of demonstrators stormed Burkina Faso’s parliament to rail against a vote that would alter the constitution and allow President Blaise Compaore to extend his 27-year rule. The protests which are now in their third day, have become increasingly violent. The New York Times reports that soldiers are firing “live rounds and [using] tear gas to repel crowds seeking to storm the building.” According to the BBC five people have died in the protests.

Above, protesters pose with a police shield outside parliament in Ouagadougou, Oct. 30.

ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images

Protesters approach parliament in Ouagadougou, Oct. 30.

A protester washes his face near parliament in Ouagadougou, Oct. 30. Police fired tear gas on demonstrators in an attempt to keep them from approaching the building.

ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images

Protesters run from tear gas, Oct. 30.

ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images

Troops face the crowd, Oct. 30.

ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images

Security officials block a road in Ouagadougou, Oct. 29.

Lougri Dimtalba/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Burkina Faso riot police arrest an opposition supporter in Ouagadougou, Oct. 28.

ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images

Police cordon off access to parliament, Oct. 29.

ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images

Demonstrators hold a sign that reads, in French, “Don’t touch my constitution,” Oct. 28.

ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images

 

People stand in front of smoke rising from Burkina Faso’s parliament building, Oct. 30.

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Near parliament, Ouagadougou, Oct. 30.

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An official holds a national flag as he flees parliament in Ouagadougou, Oct. 30.

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Soldiers near parliament, Ouagadougou, Oct. 30.

ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images

Soldiers tried to clear the crowd, Oct. 30.

ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images

Demonstrators clash with police in Ouagadougou, Oct. 28.

ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images

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