Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, November 17, 2014

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Larry Jagan explains why paralysis at the top of Burma’s government is stalling the country’s democratic transition. Ward Wilson explores the similarities between the era before World War I and today — including a deepening disillusionment with democracy. Berivan Orucoglu looks at ...

XAUME OLLEROS/AFP/Getty Images
XAUME OLLEROS/AFP/Getty Images
XAUME OLLEROS/AFP/Getty Images

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Larry Jagan explains why paralysis at the top of Burma's government is stalling the country's democratic transition.

Ward Wilson explores the similarities between the era before World War I and today -- including a deepening disillusionment with democracy.

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Larry Jagan explains why paralysis at the top of Burma’s government is stalling the country’s democratic transition.

Ward Wilson explores the similarities between the era before World War I and today — including a deepening disillusionment with democracy.

Berivan Orucoglu looks at anti-U.S. feeling in Turkey after an assault on American sailors by Turkish nationalists.

Juan Nagel reports on the Venezuelan government’s odd decision to subsidize Christmas presents.

And now for this week’s recommended read:

Foreign Policy announces this year’s top 100 global thinkers, which includes figures like Tunisian leader Houcine Abassi, artist Anila Rubiku, and the architect of Thailand’s coup, Suthep Thaugsuban.

FP‘s Emanuel Stoakes scrutinizes the Burmese state’s involvement in ethnic cleansing, while Justine Drennan explains why President Obama still believes that democracy can succeed there.

Writing for ABC News, Desmond Butler and Jack Gillum discuss the U.S. State Department’s decision to reevaluate its democracy promotion programs in countries undergoing conflict.

Dafna H. Rand analyzes Tunisia’s progress toward democracy after its latest round of elections for the National Interest.

The Washington Post‘s Simon Denyer tracks growing bitterness and division seven weeks into Hong Kong’s protests. (In the photo above, a tourist poses for a photo in front of a pro-democracy protester’s tent in the streets of Hong Kong.)

Writing for Middle East Monitor, Jamal Khashogji argues against a false dichotomy between democracy and political Islam.

Monkey Cage’s Vickie Langohr looks at new forms of gender equality activism that have emerged from the Arab Spring.

Writing for Foreign Affairs, Richard N. Haass maps out the sources of disorder in today’s "unraveling" world.

On the Weekly Wonk, Emily Schneider, Alliya Anjum Razavi, and Corri Zoli warn that instituting sharia law allows states to consolidate regime power and can give cover to corruption and violent crime.

Ahmad al-Bahri explains how ISIS is transforming the system of governance in towns under its control in Syria.

Twitter: @PrachiVidwans
Twitter: @ccaryl

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