Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, November 24, 2014

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Christian Caryl reports from the scene of a car bombing in northern Iraq apparently perpetrated by the Islamic State. In his column for this week, Caryl looks at post-coup Thailand through the eyes of an exiled Thai political analyst. Nazila Fathi asks ...

FETHI BELAID/AFP/Getty Images
FETHI BELAID/AFP/Getty Images
FETHI BELAID/AFP/Getty Images

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Christian Caryl reports from the scene of a car bombing in northern Iraq apparently perpetrated by the Islamic State. In his column for this week, Caryl looks at post-coup Thailand through the eyes of an exiled Thai political analyst.

Nazila Fathi asks how the West's nuclear talks with Tehran have been affecting the human rights situation inside Iran.

To catch Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Christian Caryl reports from the scene of a car bombing in northern Iraq apparently perpetrated by the Islamic State. In his column for this week, Caryl looks at post-coup Thailand through the eyes of an exiled Thai political analyst.

Nazila Fathi asks how the West’s nuclear talks with Tehran have been affecting the human rights situation inside Iran.

Jonathan Pinckney explains why Burkina Faso’s revolution could fail if its protesters get complacent.

Berivan Orucoglu examines the reasons behind the Turkish president’s claim that Muslims were the first to discover the New World.

Juan Nagel uncovers the surprising ideological legacy of Hugo Chávez in Spain.

And Anna Nemtsova reflects on the tragedy of political exile after the death of Georgian reformer Kakha Bendukidze.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

DemLab contributor Min Zin, writing for the New York Times, describes how the Burmese military’s siege mentality is hampering the country’s transition. Also in the New York Times, Sara Khorshid laments Egypt’s reinvigorated police state and its disdain for the freedom of expression.

International Crisis Group encourages negotiators in Mali to work for a pact that will ensure lasting peace.

Democracy International looks at a youth-run watchdog group that is using innovative methods to monitor Tunisia’s presidential elections. The Atlantic Council’s Naim Ameur evaluates the two leading candidates in Tunisia’s presidential election: Beji Caid Essebsi and Moncef Marzouki. (In the photo above, a boy watches his father vote in Tunisia’s first post-revolution presidential election.)

Brian Levy analyzes the role of anti-corruption advocacy in efforts to reform autocratic or oligarchic governments.

Writing for the Carnegie Middle East Center, Maha Yahya digs into the societal problems pushing Arab youth to join the Islamic State.

Deutsche Welle’s Grahame Lucas suggests that democracy-building tactics are the best way to fight terrorism.

Nick Danforth delves into the historical idea of a "caliphate" — and finds little to support the Islamic State’s political aspirations.

Twitter: @PrachiVidwans
Twitter: @ccaryl

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