Argument

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, April 20, 2015

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Yuliya Bila urges Ukraine to decentralize, arguing that devolving power to local authorities will strengthen the quality of governance and bolster democracy. Robert Looney warns that Ethiopia’s economic miracle threatens to run out of steam unless the government introduces meaningful ...

470034610 cropped

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Yuliya Bila urges Ukraine to decentralize, arguing that devolving power to local authorities will strengthen the quality of governance and bolster democracy.

Robert Looney warns that Ethiopia’s economic miracle threatens to run out of steam unless the government introduces meaningful democratic reforms.

Daniel Lansberg-Rodríguez explains how Venezuelan president Maduro’s body double raised eyebrows at the Summit of the Americas.

Christian Caryl argues that German author Günter Grass, who died last week, will be remembered for his art — not his politics.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

The latest issue of the Journal of Democracy contains several must-reads, including Duncan McCargo on the problems of transitional justice, Lilia Shevtsova on deepening political stagnation in Russia, and Javier Corrales on Venezuela’s autocratic legalism.

The Carnegie Endowment’s Michele Dunne describes how President Sisi is ushering in a new era of resurgent nationalism, while Shana Marshall looks at what the country’s military has gained, politically and economically, under the new regime.

In a new report for the Atlantic Council, Frederic C. Hof, Bassma Kodmani, and Jeffrey White make the case for a new national stabilization force in Syria.

An investigation by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, the Huffington Post, and other media partners reports on development projects funded by the World Bank that have displaced millions of people from their homes.

Writing for African Arguments, James Copnall covers Sudan’s elections and finds low turnout, putting their legitimacy into question. (In the photo, election workers wait for a polling station to open in Khartoum.)

Roman Olearchyk and Neil Buckley of Financial Times report on how the Ukrainian government is appointing foreigners to high-level posts to boost reform.

The International Crisis Group calls Burundi’s upcoming elections a “moment of truth” for the country’s fragile peace agreement.

Photo credit: PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images

Trending Now Sponsored Links by Taboola

By Taboola

More from Foreign Policy

By Taboola