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Longtime Staff Director of Defense Appropriations Subcommittee Departs

In a major transition in the defense industry world, Paul Juola is stepping down as Democratic staff director for the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense after more than 29 years in federal service, sources tell Foreign Policy. Known for his frighteningly calm leadership and thorough approach to the detail-intensive appropriations process, Juola’s retirement will be effective ...

WASHINGTON - JUNE 5:  The U.S. Capitol is shown June 5, 2003 in Washington, DC. Both houses of the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives meet in the Capitol.  (Photo by Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - JUNE 5: The U.S. Capitol is shown June 5, 2003 in Washington, DC. Both houses of the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives meet in the Capitol. (Photo by Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - JUNE 5: The U.S. Capitol is shown June 5, 2003 in Washington, DC. Both houses of the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives meet in the Capitol. (Photo by Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images)

In a major transition in the defense industry world, Paul Juola is stepping down as Democratic staff director for the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense after more than 29 years in federal service, sources tell Foreign Policy.

Known for his frighteningly calm leadership and thorough approach to the detail-intensive appropriations process, Juola’s retirement will be effective next Monday. A spokesman for the committee, Matt Dennis, declined to say where Juola is headed, but rumor has it an industry job is likely.

His replacement is Erin Conaton, who has worked as a defense and national security consultant, advising clients through her firm Conaton Strategies LLC. From March 2010 to December 2012, she served as undersecretary of the Air Force and subsequently as undersecretary of defense for personnel and readiness. Prior to that, she served as staff director of the House Armed Services Committee.

In a major transition in the defense industry world, Paul Juola is stepping down as Democratic staff director for the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense after more than 29 years in federal service, sources tell Foreign Policy.

Known for his frighteningly calm leadership and thorough approach to the detail-intensive appropriations process, Juola’s retirement will be effective next Monday. A spokesman for the committee, Matt Dennis, declined to say where Juola is headed, but rumor has it an industry job is likely.

His replacement is Erin Conaton, who has worked as a defense and national security consultant, advising clients through her firm Conaton Strategies LLC. From March 2010 to December 2012, she served as undersecretary of the Air Force and subsequently as undersecretary of defense for personnel and readiness. Prior to that, she served as staff director of the House Armed Services Committee.

 Getty Images

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