Johnny Depp’s Dogs Narrowly Escape Death at the Hands of Australian Bureaucrats

Pistol and Boo are en route home to the United States.

461929456crop
461929456crop

Thursday we brought you the story of actor Johnny Depp’s two Yorkshire terriers, which Australian authorities believed he had brought into the country illegally and threatened to euthanize if they were not sent back to the United States. The affair has now reached a happy ending, and the dogs, Pistol and Boo, are on their way back to the United States.

Australian Agriculture Minister Barnaby Joyce has been vocal in his efforts to enforce his country’s biosecurity laws against the superstar and celebrated the victory on Twitter:

https://twitter.com/Barnaby_Joyce/status/599162037923512320

Thursday we brought you the story of actor Johnny Depp’s two Yorkshire terriers, which Australian authorities believed he had brought into the country illegally and threatened to euthanize if they were not sent back to the United States. The affair has now reached a happy ending, and the dogs, Pistol and Boo, are on their way back to the United States.

Australian Agriculture Minister Barnaby Joyce has been vocal in his efforts to enforce his country’s biosecurity laws against the superstar and celebrated the victory on Twitter:

“Two dogs that were brought into Australia without meeting our import requirements have now been exported back to their country of origin. A Department of Agriculture officer has escorted the two dogs from the property in Queensland, where they had been held under quarantine order, to the airport for their flight home,” Joyce said in a statement. “All costs associated with returning the dogs were met by the owners.”

Australia has strict requirement on the importation of animals in order to prevent the spread of disease and invasive species. While the threats to euthanize Pistol and Boo might seem extreme, Australia has in recent years seen several invasive species arrive on its shores. The Department of Agriculture’s hardline response, in light of such incidents, doesn’t seem so extreme.

The international reaction to the incident however has included anything but a serious contemplation of the bio-risks inherent to an interconnected world and has boiled down to the hashtag #WarOnTerriers:

Kevin Winter/Getty Images

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.