Argument

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, May 18, 2015

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Cameron Hudson warns that Burma’s vulnerable Rohingya people may face an existential threat. Josh Machleder argues that only truth — not propaganda — will beat back Russia’s misinformation offensive in Ukraine. Manuel Arriaga proposes revitalizing our democracies not through trendy technology, but by ...

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To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Cameron Hudson warns that Burma’s vulnerable Rohingya people may face an existential threat.

Josh Machleder argues that only truth — not propaganda — will beat back Russia’s misinformation offensive in Ukraine.

Manuel Arriaga proposes revitalizing our democracies not through trendy technology, but by introducing the ancient practice of citizen deliberation.

Dag Detter and Stefan Fölster appeal for more effective management of state-owned assets.

Oliver Kaplan explains that, despite setbacks, Colombia’s peace talks with FARC rebels remain on track.

Finally, Jay Ulfeder looks at the data and finds that incidents of mass violence are generally on the decline.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

International Crisis Group’s Thierry Vircoulon provides an update on what’s happening in Burundi in the wake of last week’s failed coup.

In the New York Times, DemLab contributor Min Zin explains that Burma’s upcoming general election will do little to advance the country’s stalled transition unless the ruling party and the opposition can come to a viable power-sharing agreement. Meanwhile, Phuong Nguyen at the Center for Strategic and International Studies provides more context in the run-up to the vote.

Writing in Politico Magazine, Kuwaiti dissident and human rights lawyer Mohammed A. Al-Jasem calls upon President Obama to press for greater freedoms in Kuwait.

In the Monkey Cage, Barak Mendelsohn makes the case that jihadist groups like the Islamic State and Al-Qaeda pose a fundamental challenge to the international order.

In Krytyka, Halya Coynash worries that Ukraine’s proposed “decommunization” laws will violate civic sights and foment unnecessary divisions.

Writing for FP’s South Asia Channel, Athar Javaid, Anam Abdulla, and David Silverman explain why introducing student government associations to Pakistan’s colleges could play an important role in democratizing the country’s youth.

Ulrich Speck argues in Berlin Policy Journal that Russia, far from exhibiting “realistic” geopolitical behavior, is actually flouting a widely accepted rules-based international order.

And Human Rights Watch calls upon Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia to provide aid to Rohingya migrants fleeing persecution in Burma by sea rather than send their boats back into the open ocean.

The photo shows supporters of Burundi’s ruling party in Bujumbura on May 17, 2015.
Photo Credit: CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images

 

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