Transitions

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, May 26, 2015

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Howard W. French argues that President Obama’s choice to run the United States Agency for International Development exposes the bankruptcy of Washington’s thinking on Africa. Juan Nagel profiles Venezuela’s top comedian, whose act exposes the absurdity of his country’s regime. ...

Burundi cropped

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Howard W. French argues that President Obama’s choice to run the United States Agency for International Development exposes the bankruptcy of Washington’s thinking on Africa.

Juan Nagel profiles Venezuela’s top comedian, whose act exposes the absurdity of his country’s regime.

Srdja Popovic and Victoria Porell explain why reversing Venezuela’s brain drain will be crucial to a future democratic transition there.

Anton Shekhovtsov reports on the latest rightward lurch of Hungary’s increasingly authoritarian President Orbán.

And finally, Gigi Alford and Sam DuPont explain why the behavior of the head of global soccer sets a terrible example for governance around the world.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

Jonathan Stray and Drew Sullivan of the Global Investigative Journalism Network call for the development of better software to enable cross-border data mining for investigative journalism.

Democracy Digest makes the case for additional western support for Ukraine’s reform efforts.

In Foreign Policy, Thanassis Cambanis describes President Sisi’s plan for keeping a firm grip on Egypt, which is unlikely to see major change in the near future.

The Telegraph’s Harriet Alexander takes a look at African presidents who are clinging to power – and some who have set an example by walking away at the right time. (The photo above shows an opponent of incumbent President Pierre Nkurunziza carrying a weapon during an anti-government demonstration this week.)

In the Monkey Cage, Yüksel Sezgin expresses skepticism about President Edrogan’s hopes for a parliamentary supermajority after the upcoming elections.

Tetyana Lokot of Global Voices describes a creepy new scheme by the Russian government to predict future protest activity through online behavior.

Writing for the New York Times, Carlotta Gall reports on Tunisia’s new Truth and Dignity Commission, which is examining hundreds of cases of torture from the country’s era of authoritarian rule.

And finally, Barack Obama and Tunisian president Béji Caïd pen an op-ed for the Washington Post in which they pledge to defend the country’s democracy — the only one to emerge out of the Arab Spring.

CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images

 

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