Argument

An expert's point of view on a current event.

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, June 8, 2015

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.  Ilya Lozovsky interviews Tunisian activist Amira Yahyaoui, who delivers a sharp critique of the professional human rights community. Thomas Carothers asks six experts on political change to debate why new technologies have not led to democratic advances around the world. ...

GettyImages-474221034 cropped
GettyImages-474221034 cropped

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. 

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. 

Ilya Lozovsky interviews Tunisian activist Amira Yahyaoui, who delivers a sharp critique of the professional human rights community.

Thomas Carothers asks six experts on political change to debate why new technologies have not led to democratic advances around the world.

Suat Kiniklioglu looks at the remarkable career of Selahattin Demirtas, who has just led his pro-Kurdish party to a historic victory in Turkish parliamentary elections.

Emily Crane and Nicholas Linn report on Egyptian president Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi’s stealth campaign to assert control over the country’s religious establishment.

Belkis Wille examines the human costs of the Saudi-led bombing campaign in Yemen.

Mohamed Eljarh gives an update on Islamic State rule in the Libyan city of Derna, where locals are not enthused about the group’s hardline social policies.

And finally, Lorenzo Fioramonti argues that GDP is an increasingly outdated measure of economic performance — and explains why adopting new indicators could shake up global governance.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

FP’s David Kenner explains how the results of the Turkish election have transformed the country’s political landscape. Also writing for FP, Paul Bonicelli explains why it’s a mistake to conflate the George W. Bush administration’s regime change in Iraq and Afghanistan with democracy promotion.

Journalist Mohamed Fahmy takes to the pages of the New York Times to blast his former employer Al Jazeera for alleged political machinations that prompted Cairo to charge him and his colleagues with subversion.

In World Affairs Journal, Alexander Motyl interviews expert Bohdan Vivitsky on how Ukraine’s government should tackle endemic corruption.

Former U.S. Ambassador Eleni Kounalakis recounts for Washington Monthly how then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton worked to thwart rising authoritarianism in Hungary.

John M. Owen IV assesses the prospects of Islamic democracy in the Arab world for the Washington Post‘s Monkey Cage blog. Also in the Post, James Palmer castigates Western pundits for projecting their own preconceived notions onto China.

The Carnegie Endowment’s Sarah Chayes proposes an international strategy to help Nigeria’s new president clean up the country’s oil sector.

David Smilde interviews journalist Eugenio Martínez about reforming the Venezuelan electoral system for the Venezuela Politics and Human Rights blog.

And finally, Anvar Alikhan of Quartz speculates about why India has never had a military coup.

The photo shows a May 21 election rally for the pro-Kurdish HDP party, which has entered Parliament for the first time.
Photo Credit: BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images

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