Bibi’s Iran-Bashing, Now Conveniently in Farsi

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu tweeted criticisms of the Iran nuclear deal in English over the weekend. And on Monday, he turned over to Farsi.

JERUSALEM, ISRAEL - APRIL 3:  (ISRAEL OUT) In this handout provided by the Israeli Government Press Office, Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (R) delivers a statement to the press on April 3, 2015 in Jerusalem, Israel.  Netanyahu delivered a speach discussing a pending nuclear deal with Iran.   (Photo by Kobi Gideon /GPO via Getty Images)
JERUSALEM, ISRAEL - APRIL 3: (ISRAEL OUT) In this handout provided by the Israeli Government Press Office, Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (R) delivers a statement to the press on April 3, 2015 in Jerusalem, Israel. Netanyahu delivered a speach discussing a pending nuclear deal with Iran. (Photo by Kobi Gideon /GPO via Getty Images)
JERUSALEM, ISRAEL - APRIL 3: (ISRAEL OUT) In this handout provided by the Israeli Government Press Office, Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (R) delivers a statement to the press on April 3, 2015 in Jerusalem, Israel. Netanyahu delivered a speach discussing a pending nuclear deal with Iran. (Photo by Kobi Gideon /GPO via Getty Images)

As the world braces itself for the possibility of a long-awaited nuclear deal with Iran, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has a different negotiating tactic than his counterparts in the U.S. and Europe: launching a Farsi Twitter account to condemn the pending deal.

On Monday, Netanyahu used the new account, @IsraeliPM_Farsi, to call the ongoing negotiations with Iran a fast-track to Tehran -- his country’s biggest and most bitter adversary -- getting a nuclear bomb.

"With the continuation of the show of compromising with Iran, the path to Iran getting a nuclear bomb is paved, and they are being given billions of dollars for terrorism and invasion,” he wrote.

As the world braces itself for the possibility of a long-awaited nuclear deal with Iran, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has a different negotiating tactic than his counterparts in the U.S. and Europe: launching a Farsi Twitter account to condemn the pending deal.

On Monday, Netanyahu used the new account, @IsraeliPM_Farsi, to call the ongoing negotiations with Iran a fast-track to Tehran — his country’s biggest and most bitter adversary — getting a nuclear bomb.

“With the continuation of the show of compromising with Iran, the path to Iran getting a nuclear bomb is paved, and they are being given billions of dollars for terrorism and invasion,” he wrote.

Unsurprisingly, the Farsi-speaking Twitterverse wasn’t too pleased with that.

“May your eyes be gouged out,” one user replied.

“You and all of your cabinet should come and suck Iranians’ dicks,” another said.

Apparently Netanyahu didn’t think his weekend of English tweets criticizing the deal were getting his point across. Using two different Twitter handles, @netanyahu and @IsraeliPM, Bibi repeatedly criticized the ongoing negotiations, tying them to Quds Day, the final Friday in the holy month of Ramadan when many Iranians traditionally gather to protest Israel and call for a free Palestine. He posted multiple photos of Iranians burning American and Israeli flags, and of Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, claiming he was leading “a march of hate.”

It’s not clear if his Farsi campaign against the deal will be any more effective than his English one: as of late morning Monday Washington time, the new account had only garnered a few hundred followers.

Kobi Gideon /GPO via Getty Images

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