Argument

An expert's point of view on a current event.

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, July 13, 2015

Blair Glencorse and Suman Parajuli tell the story of a Nepalese reality TV show that spotlights honest civil servants. The third article in our series “Curbing Corruption: Ideas That Work.” Juan Nagel shows what it’s like to be an economist in Venezuela, where even the most basic economic statistics are treated like state secrets. Ievgen ...

GettyImages-480382574 cropped
GettyImages-480382574 cropped

Blair Glencorse and Suman Parajuli tell the story of a Nepalese reality TV show that spotlights honest civil servants. The third article in our series “Curbing Corruption: Ideas That Work.”

Blair Glencorse and Suman Parajuli tell the story of a Nepalese reality TV show that spotlights honest civil servants. The third article in our series “Curbing Corruption: Ideas That Work.”

Juan Nagel shows what it’s like to be an economist in Venezuela, where even the most basic economic statistics are treated like state secrets.

Ievgen Vorobiov explains why, despite its dire economic straits, Ukraine isn’t about to follow in Greece’s footsteps.

David Baulk looks at the human costs of Burma’s economic boom.

Rick Rowden argues that the planned Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement will be ruinous for developing countries.

Robert Looney warns that much-praised economic reforms in Morocco have stalled — creating an opportunity for extremists seeking new supporters.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

The Balkan Transitional Justice Initiative’s Marija Tausan details the extraordinary investigation that first uncovered the Srebrenica massacre, whose 25th anniversary is being commemorated this month. (In the photo, a woman mourns at the mass funeral of 136 newly-identified victims of the massacre on July 11.)

Nizar Manek and Jeremy Hodge of Foreign Affairs unveil a wide-ranging investigation into systemic corruption at the highest levels of the Egyptian government.

Writing on his blog, Mark Galeotti explains why Ukrainian President Poroshenko’s confrontation with right-wing nationalists is a critical moment for the country.

The Guardian’s Shaun Walker tells the story of a controversial Russian journalist who, despite his past as a Kremlin critic, is now launching a new television channel in the pro-Russian Donetsk People’s Republic.

Lawrence Rubin, writing for the Washington Post’s Monkey Cage blog, argues that the Islamic State will not become an ordinary member of the international community.

Caroline Alexander and Jihen Laghmari of Bloomberg Business report on the latest group of Tunisians to cross the border into war-torn Libya to join Islamic State forces there. In the New York Review of Books, Hugh Eakin asks why Tunisia — despite its successful democratic reforms — has become a hotbed of extremism.

The International Crisis Group releases a report on the troubled peace talks between Thailand’s ruling junta and rebel groups in the country’s south.

In Medium, Clemantine Wamariya and Elizabeth Weil recalls Clemantine’s journey from genocide-riven Rwanda to the United States and her struggle to come to terms with what she’s been through.

Photo credit: Matej Divizna/Getty Images

More from Foreign Policy

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping give a toast during a reception following their talks at the Kremlin in Moscow on March 21.
Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping give a toast during a reception following their talks at the Kremlin in Moscow on March 21.

Can Russia Get Used to Being China’s Little Brother?

The power dynamic between Beijing and Moscow has switched dramatically.

Xi and Putin shake hands while carrying red folders.
Xi and Putin shake hands while carrying red folders.

Xi and Putin Have the Most Consequential Undeclared Alliance in the World

It’s become more important than Washington’s official alliances today.

Russian President Vladimir Putin greets Kazakh President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev.
Russian President Vladimir Putin greets Kazakh President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev.

It’s a New Great Game. Again.

Across Central Asia, Russia’s brand is tainted by Ukraine, China’s got challenges, and Washington senses another opening.

Kurdish military officers take part in a graduation ceremony in Erbil, the capital of Iraq’s Kurdistan Region, on Jan. 15.
Kurdish military officers take part in a graduation ceremony in Erbil, the capital of Iraq’s Kurdistan Region, on Jan. 15.

Iraqi Kurdistan’s House of Cards Is Collapsing

The region once seemed a bright spot in the disorder unleashed by U.S. regime change. Today, things look bleak.