Argument

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, August 25, 2015

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.  Mark your calendars! On September 17, the Legatum Institute and Democracy Lab are hosting a panel discussion in London to discuss the major challenges facing the global anti-corruption movement. The event will be livestreamed. Min Zin asks whether Burma’s opposition ...

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To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. 

Mark your calendars! On September 17, the Legatum Institute and Democracy Lab are hosting a panel discussion in London to discuss the major challenges facing the global anti-corruption movement. The event will be livestreamed.

Min Zin asks whether Burma’s opposition is ready to move beyond Aung San Suu Kyi.

Natasha Bowler details the Bahraini government’s practice of revoking the citizenship of its internal “opponents.”

Juan Nagel explains why, despite President Maduro’s unpopularity, Venezuela’s opposition could have a hard time gaining ground in the upcoming elections.

Farah Samti reports on a new Tunisian anti-terrorism law which has human rights activists worried about potential abuses.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

For CNN, Jeffrey Lesser assesses the prospects of Brazil’s diverse protest movement against President Dilma Rousseff, which drew hundreds of thousands onto the streets last weekend. (The above photo depicts a protester in Belo Horizonte on August 16.)

Innovations for Successful Societies has released two new case studies on Indonesia’s efforts — one led by the military, the other by civilians — to redefine the military’s role in the country’s politics.

Writing for the Hudson Institute, Samuel Tadros explains how and why Egypt’s embattled Muslim Brotherhood is reeling from internal divisions.

Writing for the BBC, Kareem Abdulrahman and Roman Zagros take stock of the leadership crisis facing Iraq’s semi-autonomous Kurdistan region.

For Reuters, Panarat Thepgumpanat reports on Thailand’s new draft constitution, which many of the country’s politicians say includes anti-democratic elements. Meanwhile, in the Washington Post’s Monkey Cage blog, Todd Eisenstadt, A. Carl LeVan, and Tofigh Maboudi argue that an inclusive constitution-writing process matters more for democracy than what is actually in the text.

Photo credit: Douglas Magno/AFP/Getty Images

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