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Donald Trump and Ted Cruz Team Up to Host Rally Against Iran Deal in Washington

Ted Cruz and Donald Trump team up for an anti-Iran deal rally in Washington.

GettyImages-484797712 (2)
GettyImages-484797712 (2)

On the surface, Donald Trump and Ted Cruz couldn’t appear to be more different. Trump is a shrewd businessman who made his fortune wheeling and dealing in the real estate trade. The cerebral Texas senator is a Princeton-educated debate champion who made his name with a 21-hour protest of the Affordable Care Act on the floor of the Senate. But the 2016 rivals have managed to find shared ground on an issue they both oppose: the Iran nuclear deal.

On Thursday, Cruz and Trump announced they would hold a joint rally against the deal, to take place in Washington. Their goal is to build opposition to the accord among lawmakers, who are deciding whether to pass or reject it.

Cruz is running far behind Trump, the unexpected 2016 GOP presidential frontrunner. But as they push Congress toward a “no” vote, they’ve enlisted the Tea Party Patriots, the Zionist Organization of America, and Center for Security Policy as sponsors for the event.

On the surface, Donald Trump and Ted Cruz couldn’t appear to be more different. Trump is a shrewd businessman who made his fortune wheeling and dealing in the real estate trade. The cerebral Texas senator is a Princeton-educated debate champion who made his name with a 21-hour protest of the Affordable Care Act on the floor of the Senate. But the 2016 rivals have managed to find shared ground on an issue they both oppose: the Iran nuclear deal.

On Thursday, Cruz and Trump announced they would hold a joint rally against the deal, to take place in Washington. Their goal is to build opposition to the accord among lawmakers, who are deciding whether to pass or reject it.

Cruz is running far behind Trump, the unexpected 2016 GOP presidential frontrunner. But as they push Congress toward a “no” vote, they’ve enlisted the Tea Party Patriots, the Zionist Organization of America, and Center for Security Policy as sponsors for the event.

“We are thankful for all their hard work on this effort and will have more details on time, date, and location as they are finalized,” Cruz’s spokesperson, Catherine Frazier, said Thursday.

Trump teased the collaboration earlier Thursday, telling reporters in South Carolina that he and Cruz were plotting “something very big over the next two weeks in Washington.” He went on to call the Texas Republican a “friend of mine,” and a “good guy.”

“I think we’re going to do something next week or the week after about the Iran pact,” Trump said. “We’re going to have a tremendous crowd come out.”

Cruz’s public embrace of Trump is a curious choice this early in the campaign season. In most primaries, rivals don’t team up until after a nomination is won. Only after President Barack Obama defeated Joe Biden in the 2008 Democratic primary did he select Biden as his vice president.  Former President Ronald Reagan did the same in 1980, when he selected George H.W. Bush as vice president after Bush lost to the Gipper in the primary.

Photo Credit: Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images

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