Is God Having a Climate Moment?

Atmospheric scientist Katharine Hayhoe and activist Bill McKibben discuss the pope, global warming, and the making of faith-based environmentalism.

FP_podcast_article_artwork-1-globalthinkers
FP_podcast_article_artwork-1-globalthinkers

In this week’s Global Thinkers podcast, 2014 Global Thinker and atmospheric scientist Katharine Hayhoe joins 2009 Global Thinker and activist Bill McKibben to discuss climate change, denialism, faith, and what to expect from the upcoming Paris conference. Mindy Kay Bricker, FP executive editor for print, and FP energy reporter Keith Johnson host.

About the participants:

Katharine Hayhoe is the director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University, the CEO of Atmos Research & Consulting, and an evangelical Christian who has become one of the most effective communicators on religion and climate science in the United States. Along with her husband, an evangelical pastor, she published A Climate for Change: Global Warming Facts for Faith-Based Decisions in 2009. Hayhoe was a 2014 FP Global Thinker. Follow her on Twitter: @KHayhoe.

In this week’s Global Thinkers podcast, 2014 Global Thinker and atmospheric scientist Katharine Hayhoe joins 2009 Global Thinker and activist Bill McKibben to discuss climate change, denialism, faith, and what to expect from the upcoming Paris conference. Mindy Kay Bricker, FP executive editor for print, and FP energy reporter Keith Johnson host.

About the participants:

Katharine Hayhoe is the director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University, the CEO of Atmos Research & Consulting, and an evangelical Christian who has become one of the most effective communicators on religion and climate science in the United States. Along with her husband, an evangelical pastor, she published A Climate for Change: Global Warming Facts for Faith-Based Decisions in 2009. Hayhoe was a 2014 FP Global Thinker. Follow her on Twitter: @KHayhoe.

Bill McKibben is an environmentalist, activist, and writer. He currently is the Schumann distinguished scholar in environmental studies at Middlebury College. He has authored more than a dozen books, including 1989’s The End of Nature, widely considered the first general-audience book on climate change, and, most recently, Oil and Honey. In 2009, he founded 350.org, a global campaign devoted to grassroots climate change action. McKibben was a 2009 FP Global Thinker. Follow him on Twitter: @billmckibben.

Mindy Kay Bricker is the executive editor for print at Foreign Policy. Follow her on Twitter: @mindykaybricker.

Keith Johnson is a senior reporter covering energy geopolitics for Foreign Policy. Follow him on Twitter: @KFJ_FP.

Subscribe to the Global Thinkers podcast and other FP podcasts on iTunes here.

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