On the Road to Kunduz: Follow an FP Contributor’s Journey on Instagram

Kabul-based photographer and FP contributor Andrew Quilty is in Kunduz, Afghanistan this week to report on the fall-out from U.S. airstrikes that hit a hospital there. Follow along on Instagram @foreignpolicymag.

Screen Shot 2015-10-07 at 10.53.14 AM
Screen Shot 2015-10-07 at 10.53.14 AM

Last Monday, Afghanistan woke to the news that Kunduz, the capital of the once blue-ribbon province of international development and security efforts, had come under attack and fallen under the control of Taliban insurgents.

Kunduz is the first provincial capital to fall since the U.S.-led invasion in 2001. It represents the single biggest military defeat, certainly of the year-old Ashraf Ghani and Dr. Abdullah Abdullah coalition government, and perhaps of the entire 14 years of post-2001 Afghanistan. However the defeat isn't only significant militarily speaking. The Taliban's coup in Kunduz, even if only short-lived, comes at a time of massive dissatisfaction toward the fledgling government, dire job prospects and waning foreign aid.

Adding to the tense political situation in Kabul is fallout from air strikes on the MSF Kunduz Trauma Center, last weekend. Twenty-two people were killed, including 12 MSF staff and three children patients. Scores more were seriously injured. The circumstances surrounding the strike remain unclear, with all parties, including the Pentagon shirking full responsibility. Meanwhile, MSF is claiming that the attack constitutes a war crime and has withdrawn all of its staff from Kunduz.

Last Monday, Afghanistan woke to the news that Kunduz, the capital of the once blue-ribbon province of international development and security efforts, had come under attack and fallen under the control of Taliban insurgents.

Kunduz is the first provincial capital to fall since the U.S.-led invasion in 2001. It represents the single biggest military defeat, certainly of the year-old Ashraf Ghani and Dr. Abdullah Abdullah coalition government, and perhaps of the entire 14 years of post-2001 Afghanistan. However the defeat isn’t only significant militarily speaking. The Taliban’s coup in Kunduz, even if only short-lived, comes at a time of massive dissatisfaction toward the fledgling government, dire job prospects and waning foreign aid.

Adding to the tense political situation in Kabul is fallout from air strikes on the MSF Kunduz Trauma Center, last weekend. Twenty-two people were killed, including 12 MSF staff and three children patients. Scores more were seriously injured. The circumstances surrounding the strike remain unclear, with all parties, including the Pentagon shirking full responsibility. Meanwhile, MSF is claiming that the attack constitutes a war crime and has withdrawn all of its staff from Kunduz.

On assignment for Foreign Policy to report on the MSF hospital attack, Kabul-based photographer and regular FP contributor Andrew Quilty will be documenting his journey to Kunduz on FP’s Instagram account.

See his first three posts below, and follow along @foreignpolicymag for more.

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