Argument

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, October 26, 2015

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Lolita Brayman explains how Ukraine is disenfranchising its citizens displaced by war. Adrian Karatnycky and Alexander Motyl argue that Russia’s adventurism in Ukraine is costing Putin dearly — and that he will be increasingly amenable to pressure. Till Bruckner debunks ...

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To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Lolita Brayman explains how Ukraine is disenfranchising its citizens displaced by war.

Adrian Karatnycky and Alexander Motyl argue that Russia’s adventurism in Ukraine is costing Putin dearly — and that he will be increasingly amenable to pressure.

Till Bruckner debunks the myth that foreign investors are rapaciously snatching up vast quantities of African land.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

Time magazine offers a round-up of the nine elections that took place around the world yesterday. UN Dispatch offers additional background.

In the New York Times, Alisa Sopova reports on claims of fraud that have delayed voting and heightened tension in two Ukrainian cities. For its part, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe says that Ukraine’s local elections were “competitive and well organized.” (In the photo, an elderly woman casts her ballot at her house in the Mariupol region.)

FP’s David Doyle and Jennifer Rigby describe the complicated relationship between Burmese democratic icon Aung San Suu Kyi and her country’s persecuted Rohingya minority.

OpenDemocracy’s Francesc Badia i Dalmases argues that democracy in Latin America is facing a crucial moment, and urges action to prevent a slide back into authoritarianism.

In the Washington Post, David Kramer calls for the United States to freeze assets belonging to RT, Russia’s state-funded television network.

In the Christian Science Monitor, Fred Weir reports on the tightening of the Kremlin’s noose around Memorial, Russia’s most prominent human rights organization.

Also in the New York Times, Ernesto Londoño interviews a young Cuban journalist who is trying to launch a new media outlet in Havana.

On November 17, the National Endowment of Democracy is hosting a discussion about the assault on civil society by the world’s authoritarian regimes.

Photo credit: ANATOLII STEPANOV/AFP/Getty Images

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