Argument

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, November 9, 2015

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Christian Caryl reports from Burma on the initial results of yesterday’s historic election, which look promising for the opposition. In the lead-up to the election, Caryl captured the appeal of opposition leader Aung Sang Suu Kyi and analyzed the puzzling ...

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To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Christian Caryl reports from Burma on the initial results of yesterday’s historic election, which look promising for the opposition. In the lead-up to the election, Caryl captured the appeal of opposition leader Aung Sang Suu Kyi and analyzed the puzzling lack of concrete policy proposals on the campaign trail.

Meanwhile, as a former Burmese pro-democracy activist, Min Zin related his excitement to vote, even as he acknowledged the election’s many flaws. And Richard Cockett explained why — no matter the election’s results — the military will retain most of its power.

Meanwhile, Nicholas Linn covers the war over Libya’s oil, which is threatening to tear the country apart for good.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

Human Rights Watch reports that Hossam Baghat, a prominent Egyptian journalist and activist, has been detained and faces charges in a military court.

Writing in the Global Anticorruption Blog, Daniel Binette discusses the dilemma facing international donors when they discover massive corruption in a development project — should they disengage or not?

In a paper for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Thomas Carothers examines how western pro-democracy funders are responding to restrictions on support for civil society in authoritarian countries.

In openDemocracy, Alina Rocha Menocal asks how the United Nations’ newly adopted Sustainable Development Goals can be realized in practice.

In Fortune, Steven Cook looks at what’s ahead for Turkey in the wake of that country’s recent election, which saw the ruling AKP party regain its dominance.

In the Financial Times, Emad Mostaque warns that the damage to Egypt’s tourist sector caused by the Metrojet crash risks pushing the country over the edge.

In the New York Times, Anita Isaacs cautions against celebrating too soon after an anti-establishment actor wins Guatemala’s presidential election.

And finally, if you’re in Washington D.C. next Tuesday November 17, check out the National Endowment of Democracy’s discussion about the assault on civil society by the world’s authoritarian regimes.

In the photo, supporters of Burma’s opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi celebrate as they look at the official election results outside the National League of Democracy (NLD) headquarters in Yangon on November 9, 2015.

Photo credit: Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images

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