Which International Architecture Rules the World?

Between the Atlantic and the Pacific, recent developments and displays of power could be changing the way the world works in a fundamental way.

FP_podcast_article_artwork-1-globalthinkers
FP_podcast_article_artwork-1-globalthinkers

The transatlantic power dynamics that defined the world order following World War II have changed. Where the United States' vision of the world once dominated, China's view is becoming ever more relevant. But does a more empowered and influential East mean that the West has ceded its role as the “Producer of the Big Ideas”?

FP’s David Rothkopf, Rosa Brooks, Kori Schake, talk to Ed Luce of the Financial Times about the inevitable shift occurring now in the global system from the Atlantic to the Pacific, as the former has, in recent years, become antiquated. The panel also asks questions about the gap that still exists between the two, as the latter still lacks strategic consistency. Considering recent developments like the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and Beijing’s (largely “artificial”) military maneuvers in the South China Sea, it’s clear that the United States needs a better plan for its relationship with China.

But if the United States’ special relationships aren’t what they used to be — think Israel and the United Kingdom — who will its most important partners of the future be?

The transatlantic power dynamics that defined the world order following World War II have changed. Where the United States’ vision of the world once dominated, China’s view is becoming ever more relevant. But does a more empowered and influential East mean that the West has ceded its role as the “Producer of the Big Ideas”?

FP’s David Rothkopf, Rosa Brooks, Kori Schake, talk to Ed Luce of the Financial Times about the inevitable shift occurring now in the global system from the Atlantic to the Pacific, as the former has, in recent years, become antiquated. The panel also asks questions about the gap that still exists between the two, as the latter still lacks strategic consistency. Considering recent developments like the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and Beijing’s (largely “artificial”) military maneuvers in the South China Sea, it’s clear that the United States needs a better plan for its relationship with China.

But if the United States’ special relationships aren’t what they used to be — think Israel and the United Kingdom — who will its most important partners of the future be?

Rosa Brooks is a senior fellow at the New America Foundation and teaches international law, national security, and constitutional law at Georgetown University. Follow her on Twitter: @brooks_rosa.

Kori Schake is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, where she focuses on military history, and a former foreign-policy advisor to Sen. John McCain. Follow her on Twitter: @KoriSchake.

Ed Luce is the Financial Times’ chief U.S. commentator and columnist based in Washington, D.C. Follow him on Twitter: @EdwardGLuce.

David Rothkopf is CEO and editor of the FP Group. Follow him on Twitter: @djrothkopf.

Subscribe to The E.R. podcast and other FP podcasts on iTunes here.

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