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Report: Single Male Syrian Refugees Not Welcome in Canada

Canada reportedly won't allow single Syrian male refugees inside its borders.

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Canadians are generally considered to be among the nicest and most welcoming people in the world. That doesn’t appear to extend to a very specific group of Syrian refugees.

On Monday, the Canadian TV station CBC reported that newly-elected Prime Minister Justin Trudeau would only accept women, children, and families from the 25,000 Syrian refugees Canada plans to resettle. Single males looking to enter Canada are out of luck.

Canada is set to reveal details of their resettlement plan Tuesday. According to the CBC, security concerns in the wake of the recent terror attacks in Paris that left 130 dead will keep unaccompanied men out.

Canadians are generally considered to be among the nicest and most welcoming people in the world. That doesn’t appear to extend to a very specific group of Syrian refugees.

On Monday, the Canadian TV station CBC reported that newly-elected Prime Minister Justin Trudeau would only accept women, children, and families from the 25,000 Syrian refugees Canada plans to resettle. Single males looking to enter Canada are out of luck.

Canada is set to reveal details of their resettlement plan Tuesday. According to the CBC, security concerns in the wake of the recent terror attacks in Paris that left 130 dead will keep unaccompanied men out.

The Canadian embassy in Washington did not respond to a request for comment on Ottawa’a plans for Syrian refugees.

As in the United States, many Canadians have serious concerns about welcoming Syrians into their country. A Forum Research poll published last week found that 51 percent of Canadians don’t want the refugees to enter the country, while 60 percent believe they pose a security threat. In the United States, a recent Washington Post/ABC News poll showed 54 percent of Americans oppose taking in Syrian refugees.

Congressional Republicans, echoing arguments made north of the border, are working to block  President Barack Obama’s plan to resettle at least 10,000 Syrian refugees in the United States.

Last week, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill suspending the plan as 47 of Obama’s fellow Democrats sided against the president. The Senate is expected to take up the bill in December, even though the White House has vowed to veto it. But with 289 “yes” votes, lawmakers in the House have a veto-proof majority.

Photo Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

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