Argument

An expert's point of view on a current event.

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, December 14, 2015

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. On the occasion of Human Rights Day, Christian Caryl interviews a leading State Department official about U.S. policy on democracy and human rights. Andrew MacDowall explains why the Dayton peace accord, under which Bosnia is now clumsily governed, isn’t going ...

GettyImages-496692856 crop
GettyImages-496692856 crop

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

On the occasion of Human Rights Day, Christian Caryl interviews a leading State Department official about U.S. policy on democracy and human rights.

Andrew MacDowall explains why the Dayton peace accord, under which Bosnia is now clumsily governed, isn’t going away anytime soon.

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

On the occasion of Human Rights Day, Christian Caryl interviews a leading State Department official about U.S. policy on democracy and human rights.

Andrew MacDowall explains why the Dayton peace accord, under which Bosnia is now clumsily governed, isn’t going away anytime soon.

Farah Samti reports from a subdued Tunis about what it’s like to live in a city under curfew.

Javier Corrales explains why so many Venezuelans voted against the ruling socialists — and why so many others didn’t.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

In the World Post, Ted Piccone debunks 5 myths about the supposedly hopeless and ineffectual U.N. Human Rights Council. Also in the World Post, Charlotte Alfred reports on the horrific toll the war in Yemen has exacted on the country’s children.

In the Atlantic Council’s New Atlanticist blog, Anders Aslund and John Herbst call for a Biden-Poroshenko Commission to heighten cooperation between the United States and Ukraine.

In the New York Times, Ivan Krastev explains why Poland has taken an alarming “illiberal turn.”

In the Guardian, Thomas Meaney paints a fascinating portrait of Edward Luttwak, a self-proclaimed “grand strategist” and consultant to presidents, generals, and intelligence agencies the world over.

The Syria Justice and Accountability Centre challenges some of the harmful ideas being propagated about the Islamic State, refugees, and the war in Syria.

In VoxEurop, Alina Mungiu-Pippidi explains how the culture of corruption within FIFA is similar to that of some of the world’s worst-governed countries. Dr. Mungiu-Puppidi’s new book, The Quest for Good Governance, is now available from Cambridge University Press.

In Al Monitor, Democracy Lab contributor Christine Petré reports on how Tunisia’s Ministry of Religious Affairs is trying to challenge Islamic extremists and strengthen moderate Islam.

Ahram Online reports that a prominent Egyptian anti-corruption activist and former MP, Hamdi El-Fakharany, has been sentenced to four years in prison.

In the photo, right-wing demonstrators annual march in Warsaw on November 11, 2015 in commemoration of Poland’s National Independence Day.

Photo credit: JANEK SKARZYNSKI/AFP/Getty Images

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