Watch Trailers for the Oscars’ 5 Foreign-Film Nominees

On Thursday, the finalists for 2016's Academy Awards were announced. Here are the foreign-film nominations.

BRENTWOOD, CA - FEBRUARY 24: Nate Sanders displays the collection of Oscar statuettes that his auction company will sell online to the highest bidder on February 24, 2012 in Brentwood, California. (Photo by Toby Canham/Getty Images)
BRENTWOOD, CA - FEBRUARY 24: Nate Sanders displays the collection of Oscar statuettes that his auction company will sell online to the highest bidder on February 24, 2012 in Brentwood, California. (Photo by Toby Canham/Getty Images)
BRENTWOOD, CA - FEBRUARY 24: Nate Sanders displays the collection of Oscar statuettes that his auction company will sell online to the highest bidder on February 24, 2012 in Brentwood, California. (Photo by Toby Canham/Getty Images)

Movies from Denmark, Colombia, France, Hungary, and Jordan were named finalists Thursday for the 2016 Academy Award for best foreign-language film.

The winner will be announced in the official awards ceremony, also known as the Oscars, on Feb. 28.

Ahead of that night, Foreign Policy’s Passport blog will showcase each of the five nominees. But for now, watch trailers for each film below:

Movies from Denmark, Colombia, France, Hungary, and Jordan were named finalists Thursday for the 2016 Academy Award for best foreign-language film.

The winner will be announced in the official awards ceremony, also known as the Oscars, on Feb. 28.

Ahead of that night, Foreign Policy’s Passport blog will showcase each of the five nominees. But for now, watch trailers for each film below:

A War, Denmark. Directed by Tobias Lindholm.

A Danish army commander struggles to cope with a split-second decision he made in Afghanistan — one that ends up implicating not only himself, but also his wife, his children, and his company of soldiers.

Embrace of the Serpent, Colombia. Directed by Ciro Guerra.

Colombian shaman Karamakate leads Theo, a German explorer, through the Colombian Amazon on an intense search for a plant he believes could cure Theo’s mysterious illness. Four decades later, the healer finds himself on a similar expedition with an American scientist.

Mustang, France. Directed by Deniz Gamze Erguven.

Five orphaned teenage sisters living in northern Turkey have their lives changed forever when they are seen playing with male friends, and their caretakers are told they were acting promiscuous. Their extended family reacts by keeping them away from the outside world, which only strengthens their bond and their shared determination to escape from arranged marriages.

Son of Saul, Hungary. Directed by Laszlo Nemes.

Saul Auslander is a Hungarian Jew forced by Nazis to lead other concentration camp inmates to their deaths — and then burn their bodies in crematoriums. When Saul finds a boy he believes is his son, he tries to organize a Jewish funeral for him.

Theeb, Jordan. Directed by Naji Abu Nowar.

In 1916, a British officer asks recently orphaned brothers Hussein and Theeb to guide him through the Arabian Desert. The boys, who lived a Bedouin lifestyle, find themselves suddenly immersed in international affairs.  

Photo credit: Toby Canham/Getty Images

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