Argument

An expert's point of view on a current event.

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, February 1, 2016

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Thomas Carothers makes the case that United States democracy promotion organizations should include their own country their efforts. DemLab’s Ilya Lozovsky argues that the vaunted Freedom House index of freedom in the world should be taken seriously despite its flaws. ...

GettyImages-507827506 crop
GettyImages-507827506 crop

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Thomas Carothers makes the case that United States democracy promotion organizations should include their own country their efforts.

DemLab’s Ilya Lozovsky argues that the vaunted Freedom House index of freedom in the world should be taken seriously despite its flaws.

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Thomas Carothers makes the case that United States democracy promotion organizations should include their own country their efforts.

DemLab’s Ilya Lozovsky argues that the vaunted Freedom House index of freedom in the world should be taken seriously despite its flaws.

Hannah Thoburn explains why and how Russian President Vladimir Putin invokes the memory of Stalin to prop up his rule.

Emily Crane Linn reports on how the Egyptian military’s involvement in the economy has intensified under President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi.

Josh Cohen proposes that Ukraine delegate its anti-corruption fight to an international body.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

Today marks a historic watershed for Burma, as Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy takes its seats in parliament as the majority party. Sara Perria and Oliver Holmes report for The Guardian. The Irrawaddy‘s Aung Zaw weighs in on the military’s plans for the new era.

Reporting for the Carnegie Endowment, Amy Austin Holmes and Hussein Baoumi show that, far from presiding over an era of public resignation, Egypt’s President Sisi has faced an unprecedented wave of protest. In the Washington Post, Amr Hamzawy and Michael McFaul argue that only democratization can give Egypt genuine stability. Also in the Post, David Ignatius makes the case that then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s cautious reaction to the Egyptian revolution was the right one.

Francis Fukuyama tells Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty why Vladimir Putin has failed to build a successful alternative to liberal democracy.

The Economist explains why Latin American governments need to work harder to modernize their bureaucracies.

In the Atlantic Council’s New Atlanticist blog, James Brooke sees signs of economic revival in Ukraine’s western regions.

Writing for Mosaic Science, Lyra McKee wonders why the suicide rate has spiked in post-conflict Northern Ireland.

Democracy Digest looks ahead to this month’s parliamentary elections in Iran.

And finally, OpenDemocracy’s Lily Lynch offers a sarcastic handbook on writing about the Balkans.

In the photo, legislators attend a session of the newly elected lower house of parliament in Naypyidaw, Burma on February 1, 2016.

Photo credit: YE AUNG THU/AFP/Getty Images

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