New Zealand Official Feels Privileged to Have Had Dildo Thrown at His Face

A New Zealand minister had a dildo thrown at his face. Good thing he thought it was funny.

Screen Shot 2016-02-05 at 12.55.58 PM
Screen Shot 2016-02-05 at 12.55.58 PM

New Zealand’s Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce thought Friday would just be a regular day at work. Then a nurse threw a dildo at his face.  

The flying fake penis was an unexpected interruption of the politician’s press conference, which he held to debrief reporters after meeting with Iwi (not to be confused with Kiwi) leaders in Auckland to discuss the controversial Trans Pacific Partnership agreement.

“That’s for raping our sovereignty!” Josie Butler screamed after throwing the rather large sex toy at his face. He responded with a barely audible “oof.”

New Zealand’s Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce thought Friday would just be a regular day at work. Then a nurse threw a dildo at his face.  

The flying fake penis was an unexpected interruption of the politician’s press conference, which he held to debrief reporters after meeting with Iwi (not to be confused with Kiwi) leaders in Auckland to discuss the controversial Trans Pacific Partnership agreement.

“That’s for raping our sovereignty!” Josie Butler screamed after throwing the rather large sex toy at his face. He responded with a barely audible “oof.”

Security officials immediately apprehended Butler, and as they dragged her away for questioning she laughed and repeated “Yep, I know” — her hands held up to prove she had no more dildos to throw.

Lucky for her, Joyce was OK with having a sex toy thrown at his face at work. “Fair to say I don’t think those sorts of things happen every day,” he told TVNZ, a New Zealand television station. “We actually thought it was a little bit humorous at the end of it all. New experiences in politics every day, it’s the privilege of serving.” He later tweeted that someone should “get it over with” and send the video to John Oliver — whose weekly show has at times mocked New Zealand politicians.

The privilege to serve, however, was not all Joyce’s. Butler works as a nurse, and told TVNZ she protested against the secretly negotiated TPP because she fears it will threaten her patients’ access to healthcare, and considers it her duty to speak up.

“I’m here as a nurse because I’m worried about the patient rights, and how many people will essentially die if this goes through because the price of medication’s going up,” she said. According to her Facebook page, she was released by police and will not face charges.

“It’s something I feel really strongly about,” she said in reference to the TPP.

Yeah, no kidding.

Watch the dildo throwing action below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eCZkgZDMxTM

Photo Credit: Screenshot

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