Québec to Trudeau: You Can’t Make Us Sell Marijuana

Justin Trudeau promised he would legalize marijuana. But he might not have Quebec's help.

Visitors pose in front of a flag similiar to the Canadian one but showing a cannabis plant instead of a maple leaf at a store in Eastside Vancouver during the Vancouver Winter Olympics on February 22, 2010.         AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON      (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Visitors pose in front of a flag similiar to the Canadian one but showing a cannabis plant instead of a maple leaf at a store in Eastside Vancouver during the Vancouver Winter Olympics on February 22, 2010. AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Visitors pose in front of a flag similiar to the Canadian one but showing a cannabis plant instead of a maple leaf at a store in Eastside Vancouver during the Vancouver Winter Olympics on February 22, 2010. AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)

Among Justin Trudeau’s many promises to make Canada great again? Nationwide legalization of marijuana.

But according to Québec’s finance minister, Carlos Leitao, his province has “no plan, no idea, and no intention of commercializing [marijuana].”

Leitao told Canadian newspaper La Presse Thursday that he “will never have the obligation to commercialize [marijuana] even if it becomes legal,” and does not want to be involved in federal government distribution plans. “It’s not up to the province of Quebec to do that,” he said.  

Among Justin Trudeau’s many promises to make Canada great again? Nationwide legalization of marijuana.

But according to Québec’s finance minister, Carlos Leitao, his province has “no plan, no idea, and no intention of commercializing [marijuana].”

Leitao told Canadian newspaper La Presse Thursday that he “will never have the obligation to commercialize [marijuana] even if it becomes legal,” and does not want to be involved in federal government distribution plans. “It’s not up to the province of Quebec to do that,” he said.  

Leitao, who belongs to Québec’s Liberal Party, made the comments amid speculation that marijuana could be sold out of liquor stores that are government-run.

Trudeau’s promises of marijuana legalization do have some caveats: It will be strictly regulated and distribution methods will be determined through conversations with local authorities in every province.  

Thursday evening, Leitao clarified his response on Facebook, saying that he believes it is too early to determine how and when weed will be distributed in his province. But one thing he made clear: “These choices will be made by the government of Québec.”

Photo Credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images

Tag: Canada

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