Bernie Sanders’s Campaign Is Not a Real Revolution

The United States isn’t going to see the kind of change brought by the Arab Spring and Euromaidan—no matter how many millennials rock the vote.

FP_podcast_article_artwork-1-globalthinkers
FP_podcast_article_artwork-1-globalthinkers

Regardless of political party, much has been made over which presidential hopeful will capture the attention — and, more importantly, the support — of the younger generation of U.S. voters.

In this special edition of The E.R., David Rothkopf hosts FP millennials Siobhán O'Grady, Benjamin Soloway, and Reid Standish to talk presidential election politics, what it’s like reporting political turmoil from Congo to Ukraine, and why “heroes” of the filmmaking industry are still getting snubbed at the Oscars.

From Hillary Clinton’s inability to rally a base of young female voters to why Canada is afraid of a President Trump, the panel grapples with some tough questions: How has a man in his mid-70s galvanized the political support of the younger generation? Can you be a feminist and not vote for Clinton? Has the mechanism of social media -- i.e. Facebook and Twitter -- freed the youth voice or stifled it in what is essentially a never-ending echo chamber? Is there actually a difference between today’s millennials and every generation that has come before them? And why can’t the kind of political upheaval that led to the Arab Spring and Euromaidan — and the real change that followed -- happen in the United States?

Regardless of political party, much has been made over which presidential hopeful will capture the attention — and, more importantly, the support — of the younger generation of U.S. voters.

In this special edition of The E.R., David Rothkopf hosts FP millennials Siobhán O’Grady, Benjamin Soloway, and Reid Standish to talk presidential election politics, what it’s like reporting political turmoil from Congo to Ukraine, and why “heroes” of the filmmaking industry are still getting snubbed at the Oscars.

From Hillary Clinton’s inability to rally a base of young female voters to why Canada is afraid of a President Trump, the panel grapples with some tough questions: How has a man in his mid-70s galvanized the political support of the younger generation? Can you be a feminist and not vote for Clinton? Has the mechanism of social media — i.e. Facebook and Twitter — freed the youth voice or stifled it in what is essentially a never-ending echo chamber? Is there actually a difference between today’s millennials and every generation that has come before them? And why can’t the kind of political upheaval that led to the Arab Spring and Euromaidan — and the real change that followed — happen in the United States?

Siobhán O’Grady is a staff writer at FP. Follow her on Twitter: @siobhan_ogrady.

Benjamin Soloway is the editorial assistant at FP. Follow him on Twitter: @bsoloway.

Reid Standish is the assistant digital producer at FP. Follow him on Twitter: @ReidStan.

David Rothkopf is the CEO and editor of the FP Group. Follow him on Twitter: @djrothkopf.

Subscribe to The E.R. podcast and other FP podcasts on iTunes here.

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