Is Cuba Really a Triumph for Obama?

As his last year in office winds down, the president looks to cement his legacy by forging a new path in Latin America.

FP_podcast_article_artwork-1-globalthinkers
FP_podcast_article_artwork-1-globalthinkers

This week on The E.R., the panel takes the conversation to Cuba, in the wake of U.S. President Barack Obama’s historic — and controversial — visit to the island nation. Foreign Policy’s David Rothkopf, Yochi Dreazen, and Kori Schake, along with David Sanger of the New York Times, explore the pitfalls and promises of the change in U.S. policy toward Cuba.

While Obama’s critics are deriding his outreach to Cuban President Raúl Castro, the panel wonders: After nearly 60 years of one failed policy approach, isn’t it time to finally make a big change? But whether U.S. policymakers can really point to Cuba as an example of how isolating a country with economic sanctions can be successful remains to be seen.

And even though it was high time for a new approach to the relationship with Cuba, is it still a strategically significant nation? And with a stop in Argentina up next for Obama, will this trip set off the strengthening of U.S. ties with the rest of Latin America?

This week on The E.R., the panel takes the conversation to Cuba, in the wake of U.S. President Barack Obama’s historic — and controversial — visit to the island nation. Foreign Policy’s David Rothkopf, Yochi Dreazen, and Kori Schake, along with David Sanger of the New York Times, explore the pitfalls and promises of the change in U.S. policy toward Cuba.

While Obama’s critics are deriding his outreach to Cuban President Raúl Castro, the panel wonders: After nearly 60 years of one failed policy approach, isn’t it time to finally make a big change? But whether U.S. policymakers can really point to Cuba as an example of how isolating a country with economic sanctions can be successful remains to be seen.

And even though it was high time for a new approach to the relationship with Cuba, is it still a strategically significant nation? And with a stop in Argentina up next for Obama, will this trip set off the strengthening of U.S. ties with the rest of Latin America?

Yochi Dreazen is the managing editor for news at FP and author of The Invisible Front. Follow him on Twitter at: @YochiDreazen.

David Sanger is the chief Washington correspondent for the New York Times and author of Confront and Conceal: Obama’s Secret Wars and Surprising Use of American Power. Follow him on Twitter at: @SangerNYT.

Kori Schake is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, where she focuses on military history, and is a former foreign-policy advisor to Sen. John McCain. Follow her on Twitter at: @KoriSchake.

David Rothkopf is the CEO and editor of the FP Group. Follow him on Twitter at: @djrothkopf.

Subscribe to The E.R. podcast and other FP podcasts on iTunes here.

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