Passport

Watch: ‘Erdowie, Erdowo, Erdogan’ — The Video That Made Turkey Mad Enough to Summon the German Ambassador

The video shows footage of Erdogan’s most absurd public moments, intercut with crackdowns on protesters.

Screen Shot 2016-03-29 at 12.34.50 PM

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan doesn’t like being made fun of by anyone — not by people sitting at home in front of their televisions, not by Internet trolls who created a meme comparing him to Lord of the Rings character Gollum, not by the journalists he has imprisoned at an alarming rate, and not by Germany.

That's why the Turkish Foreign Ministry formally summoned German Ambassador Martin Erdmann to discuss “Erdowie, Erdowo, Erdogan,” a song and video that aired on Extra 3, a satire program on German public broadcaster NDR.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2e2yHjc_mc

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan doesn’t like being made fun of by anyone — not by people sitting at home in front of their televisions, not by Internet trolls who created a meme comparing him to Lord of the Rings character Gollum, not by the journalists he has imprisoned at an alarming rate, and not by Germany.

That’s why the Turkish Foreign Ministry formally summoned German Ambassador Martin Erdmann to discuss “Erdowie, Erdowo, Erdogan,” a song and video that aired on Extra 3, a satire program on German public broadcaster NDR.

The video shows footage of Erdogan’s most absurd public moments, intercut with crackdowns on protesters. “Equal rights for women: beaten up equally,” the song goes, as police beat women with batons.

Despite mounting human rights abuses, Germany can’t afford to be too hard on Turkey these days, with a refugee deal on the line. Turkey has agreed to take back refugees who reach Greece by boat, in exchange for the resettlement of refugees currently in Turkey and other concessions by the EU.

By summoning Germany’s ambassador, Erdogan has continued efforts to extend the reach of his crackdown on free speech beyond Turkey’s borders. This month, Der Spiegel, the magazine that broke the story of the diplomatic spat over the video, had to withdraw its Istanbul correspondent over concerns about the government’s treatment of the press.

Image credit: Extra 3/YouTube

 Twitter: @bsoloway

More from Foreign Policy

Volker Perthes, U.N. special representative for Sudan, addresses the media in Khartoum, Sudan, on Jan. 10.

Sudan’s Future Hangs in the Balance

Demonstrators find themselves at odds with key U.N. and U.S. mediators.

In an aerial view, traffic creeps along Virginia Highway 1 after being diverted away from Interstate 95 after it was closed due to a winter storm.

Traffic Jams Are a Very American Disaster

The I-95 backup shows how easily highways can become traps.

Relatives and neighbors gather around a burned vehicle targeted and hit by an American drone strike in Kabul.

The Human Rights vs. National Security Dilemma Is a Fallacy

Advocacy organizations can’t protect human rights without challenging U.S. military support for tyrants and the corrupt influence of the defense industry and foreign governments.

un-sanctions-inspectors-china-foreign-policy-illustration

The Problem With Sanctions

From the White House to Turtle Bay, sanctions have never been more popular. But why are they so hard to make work?