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Dating Site Wants to Help Americans Flee Trump by Meeting Canadians

Joe Goldman, 25, is dead serious about dating across the 49th parallel.

TETBURY, UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 22:  Autumnal colours are seen on the leaves of trees at the National Arboretum at Westonbirt on October 22, 2005 in Gloucestershire in England.  (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
TETBURY, UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 22: Autumnal colours are seen on the leaves of trees at the National Arboretum at Westonbirt on October 22, 2005 in Gloucestershire in England. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

Joe Goldman, 25, is dead serious about dating across the 49th parallel.

His new site, Maple Match, “makes it easy for Americans to find the ideal Canadian partner to save them from the unfathomable horror of a Trump presidency.”

So far, over 11,000 people have signed up, more than 25 percent of them Canadian, although the service hasn’t even gone live yet, Goldman told Foreign Policy.

The site seems like it would be Canadian, but it’s not — Goldman is from El Paso, Texas, lives in Washington, D.C., and said the company is based in Austin, Texas. And it seems like it would be a joke, but it’s not. “I was the first person to sign up for Maple Match, and if I find the Canadian of my dreams, I’ll get up and move to Canada, if that’s what we decide is best for us,” he told FP.

The election provided him an opportunity to focus attention on a service he said the dating app market sorely lacked.

“Americans and Canadians have been destined to be much closer than they are right now,” he said. “We’re pretty much from the same stock, and the countries are both melting pots.”

Americans unhappy with election candidates have long joked, or half-joked, about moving north, to the land of universal healthcare. Lena Dunham has pledged to do so if Trump wins, and the Canadian immigration website experienced delays on Super Tuesday as Trump surged ahead in the polls, prompting increased traffic. Election aside, American comedy has perpetuated a long-standing meme: the Canadian girlfriend, whose existence remains unsubstantiated. But Maple Match isn’t kidding.

Three quarters of Canadians live within a hundred miles of the U.S. border. Goldman thinks the election is his chance to get them, and their counterparts to the South, to intermingle with the exotic. “I’ve always been fascinated by Canada,” he said. “Never seeing snow growing up makes you always wonder what it would be like to experience a snowy winter.”

He had no details on how the site is to work, what technology it will employ, or when he expects to roll out a working version. For now, he’s all about hype.

“I did three interviews [Tuesday] morning with Canadian radio stations — Canadians are very interested in finding love,” he said. “This is a real opportunity: People are very concerned about a Trump presidency, and people view Canada as a place where they find me more acceptance and more integration.”

But if you want to use the site to date people without going international, Goldman won’t try to stop you.

“If you’re open to meeting people in your own country, then why not,” he said.

Photo credit: PETER MACDIARMID/Getty Images

Benjamin Soloway is an associate editor at Foreign Policy. @bsoloway

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