Longform’s Picks of the Week

The best stories from around the world.

A picture taken  in Calais on October 7, 2015 shows a site dubbed the "New Jungle", where some 3,000 people have set up camp -- most seeking desperately to get to England, . The slum-like migrant camp sprung up after the closure of notorious Red Cross camp Sangatte in 2002, which had become overcrowded and prone to violent riots. However migrants and refugees have kept coming and the "New Jungle" has swelled along with the numbers of those making  often deadly attempts to smuggle themselves across the Channel.  AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE HUGUEN
A picture taken in Calais on October 7, 2015 shows a site dubbed the "New Jungle", where some 3,000 people have set up camp -- most seeking desperately to get to England, . The slum-like migrant camp sprung up after the closure of notorious Red Cross camp Sangatte in 2002, which had become overcrowded and prone to violent riots. However migrants and refugees have kept coming and the "New Jungle" has swelled along with the numbers of those making often deadly attempts to smuggle themselves across the Channel. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE HUGUEN
A picture taken in Calais on October 7, 2015 shows a site dubbed the "New Jungle", where some 3,000 people have set up camp -- most seeking desperately to get to England, . The slum-like migrant camp sprung up after the closure of notorious Red Cross camp Sangatte in 2002, which had become overcrowded and prone to violent riots. However migrants and refugees have kept coming and the "New Jungle" has swelled along with the numbers of those making often deadly attempts to smuggle themselves across the Channel. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE HUGUEN

Every weekend, Longform highlights its favorite international articles of the week. For daily picks of new and classic nonfiction, check out Longform or follow @longform on Twitter. Have an iPad? Download Longform’s new app and read all of the latest in-depth stories from dozens of magazines, including Foreign Policy.

"Front Runner" by Elisabeth Zerofsky, Harper's

Every weekend, Longform highlights its favorite international articles of the week. For daily picks of new and classic nonfiction, check out Longform or follow @longform on Twitter. Have an iPad? Download Longform’s new app and read all of the latest in-depth stories from dozens of magazines, including Foreign Policy.

PARIS, FRANCE - MAY 18: French far-right Front National (FN) party president Marine Le Pen delivers a speech during a campaign meeting of FN for the European elections on May 18, in Paris, France. The European Parliamentary elections will take place from May 22 to May 25, 2014, during which far right parties are predicted to make significant gains.Photo by christian Liewig (Photo by liewig christian/Corbis via Getty Images)

PARIS, FRANCE - MAY 18: French far-right Front National (FN) party president Marine Le Pen delivers a speech during a campaign meeting of FN for the European elections on May 18, in Paris, France. The European Parliamentary elections will take place from May 22 to May 25, 2014, during which far right parties are predicted to make significant gains.Photo by christian Liewig (Photo by liewig christian/Corbis via Getty Images)

Front Runner” by Elisabeth Zerofsky, Harper’s

Marine Le Pen’s campaign to make France great again.

The official seat of the European Parliament is a steel and glass city within a city that spreads out across the Ill River in Strasbourg, France. Completed in 1999, at a cost of about half a billion dollars, the two-million-square-foot structure was conceived as a symbol of the European Union’s postwar utopian vision. In its gleaming vastness, with multiple cylindrical halls that resemble giant gears, the complex calls to mind an ultramodern factory. It is difficult to say what exactly is being produced by the thousands of delegates, aides, and staff who bustle along the building’s elevated oak walkways, but the profusion of Greek and Latin nomenclature (the plenary chamber is called the hémicycle; the visitors’ gallery is the tribune) might lead one to believe that the primary output of the place is democracy.

This impression is not shared by Marine Le Pen, the leader of France’s far-right National Front party (F.N.), which her father, Jean-Marie Le Pen, helped establish four decades ago. In 2014, Marine Le Pen campaigned for a seat in the European parliamentary elections on an unapologetically anti-Europe platform. The F.N. asked to be sent to an institution whose legitimacy it did not accept, and French voters rewarded the party with first place in the election.

In this photograph taken on April 13, 2016, Nepalese mountaineer Lakpa Sherpa prepares her equipment during an interview with AFP in Kathmandu. The daughter of a yak herder, Lhakpa Sherpa worked as a porter and kitchen hand on trekking and mountaineering expeditions when she was young, before climbing solo. Generations of men from Nepal's famed Sherpa community have climbed the Himalayas, while their wives and daughters have traditionally kept the home fires burning. But in a sign of changing times, a string of Sherpa women are now breaking records themselves, not only on 8,848-metre (29,029-foot) high Everest but other dangerous peaks. / AFP / PRAKASH MATHEMA / TO GO WITH AFP STORY NEPAL-MOUNTAINEERING-GENDER-QUAKE,FEATURE BY AMMU KANNAMPILLY (Photo credit should read PRAKASH MATHEMA/AFP/Getty Images)

In this photograph taken on April 13, 2016, Nepalese mountaineer Lakpa Sherpa prepares her equipment during an interview with AFP in Kathmandu. The daughter of a yak herder, Lhakpa Sherpa worked as a porter and kitchen hand on trekking and mountaineering expeditions when she was young, before climbing solo. Generations of men from Nepal's famed Sherpa community have climbed the Himalayas, while their wives and daughters have traditionally kept the home fires burning. But in a sign of changing times, a string of Sherpa women are now breaking records themselves, not only on 8,848-metre (29,029-foot) high Everest but other dangerous peaks. / AFP / PRAKASH MATHEMA / TO GO WITH AFP STORY NEPAL-MOUNTAINEERING-GENDER-QUAKE,FEATURE BY AMMU KANNAMPILLY (Photo credit should read PRAKASH MATHEMA/AFP/Getty Images)

The Most Successful Female Everest Climber of All Time Is a Housekeeper in Hartford, Connecticut” by Grayson Schaffer, Outside

Lhakpa Sherpa has climbed Everest more than any other woman—and now she’s on the mountain trying for her seventh summit. So why doesn’t anyone know her name?

Lhakpa Sherpa awoke before dawn on a cold Connecticut morning in January 2015 and shuffled into the kitchen of her two-bedroom apartment in West Hartford. The walls were covered in drawings and coloring-book pages of Disney princesses shaded in crayon and pencil by her two daughters, ages 8 and 13. She brewed up a small pot of coffee rather than the milk tea she grew up on in Balakharka, a village in the Makalu region of the Nepalese Himalayas. The apartment was clean, the girls’ toys packed away against the walls, and the building, though older, was more or less in good repair. It seemed secure.

“I’m very sad inside, but I never show people sad,” she said. “I’m all the time happy.” I asked whether she was sure she wanted her story told. She was.

20151010_Quilty_MSF_Knz_Afg_024

20151010_Quilty_MSF_Knz_Afg_024

Death From the Sky” by May Jeong, The Intercept

Searching for Ground Truth in the Kunduz Hospital Bombing.

When the Taliban overran Kunduz last September after a monthlong siege, the northern Afghan city became the first to fall to the insurgency since the war began in 2001. A week earlier, many Kunduz residents had left town to observe Eid al-Adha, the sacrificial feast honoring Abraham’s act of submission to God. The heavy fighting sent the remaining Kunduzis fleeing as dead bodies littered the streets.

On Friday, October 2, the city lay quiet, with just one building lit up against the dark sky. Most other international organizations had evacuated when the fighting began, but the Kunduz Trauma Center run by Médecins Sans Frontières remained open throughout the battle for the city. It was one of the few buildings with a generator. Throughout the week, violence seemed to lap against the walls of the hospital without ever engulfing it. All around the 35,620-square-meter compound, the site of an old cotton factory, fighting ebbed and flowed. Doctors and nurses marked the intensity of battle by the freshly wounded who arrived at the gate. According to MSF, the hospital treated 376 emergency patients between September 28, when the city fell, and October 2.

A picture taken in Calais on October 7, 2015 shows a site dubbed the "New Jungle", where some 3,000 people have set up camp -- most seeking desperately to get to England, . The slum-like migrant camp sprung up after the closure of notorious Red Cross camp Sangatte in 2002, which had become overcrowded and prone to violent riots. However migrants and refugees have kept coming and the "New Jungle" has swelled along with the numbers of those making often deadly attempts to smuggle themselves across the Channel. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE HUGUEN (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images)

A picture taken in Calais on October 7, 2015 shows a site dubbed the "New Jungle", where some 3,000 people have set up camp -- most seeking desperately to get to England, . The slum-like migrant camp sprung up after the closure of notorious Red Cross camp Sangatte in 2002, which had become overcrowded and prone to violent riots. However migrants and refugees have kept coming and the "New Jungle" has swelled along with the numbers of those making often deadly attempts to smuggle themselves across the Channel. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE HUGUEN (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images)

The gangsters on England’s doorstep” by Felicity Lawrence, The Guardian

In the bleak flatlands of East Anglia, migrant workers are controlled by criminal gangs, and some are forced to commit crimes to pay off their debts. This is what happens when cheap labour is our only priority.

At 3am outside the BP petrol station in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, the January sky was still black, but the solitary garage attendant was already serving migrant workers. By 4.15am, dark and silent figures crossing the town had become a steady flow towards the light of the pumps on Freedom Bridge roundabout.

Summoned by a text late the evening before, they huddled in threes and fours on the edge of the forecourt, waiting for a succession of vehicles that would take them to shifts lasting between 10 and 12 hours, in fields and factories across the region. The mumbled greetings were almost all in Latvian, Russian or Lithuanian. Three old vehicles pulled in to fill up with passengers and petrol, and then set off. Those still waiting shared cigarettes and shifted from foot to foot in the Fenland frost. Not long after, a blue BMW with a Latvian number plate cruised into the station, thumping out a bass track loud enough to shake the ground and wake the whole street. A police patrol car appeared, ran slowly round the roundabout and drove off, back the way it had come.

PITTSBURGH - SEPTEMBER 07: A view of Pittsburgh at sunrise from the observation deck of the Duquesne Incline on September 8, 2008 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Duquesne Incline opened in 1877 and is used to carry up to 30 passengers at a time up and down Mt. Washington to various modes of transportation. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

PITTSBURGH - SEPTEMBER 07: A view of Pittsburgh at sunrise from the observation deck of the Duquesne Incline on September 8, 2008 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Duquesne Incline opened in 1877 and is used to carry up to 30 passengers at a time up and down Mt. Washington to various modes of transportation. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

How Steel City Became the Front Line in America’s Cyberwar” by Elias Groll, Foreign Policy

Blending gumshoe investigations with high-tech research, Pittsburgh has become a hotbed of the Justice Department’s fight against international hackers.

The portraits of Chinese army officers mounted on poster board stare down from the walls of the FBI’s western Pennsylvania field office.

Though they will probably never see the inside of a courtroom, the five men represent the culmination of arguably the most significant cybercrime investigation to date carried out by federal agents based in Pittsburgh: the case against the People’s Liberation Army hackers who were indicted in 2014 for stealing industry secrets from the computers of major American companies.

Over the last 15 years, Pittsburgh has emerged as a perhaps surprising center of high-profile cybercrime investigations. Down in Washington, FBI Director James Comey complains that encrypted communications and other data advances have resulted in investigations going “dark” as suspects evade the government’s efforts to nab them online.

Photo credit: liewig christian/Corbis via Getty Images; PRAKASH MATHEMA/AFP/Getty Images; Andrew Quilty/Foreign Policy; PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images; Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

More from Foreign Policy

A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.
A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.

Lessons for the Next War

Twelve experts weigh in on how to prevent, deter, and—if necessary—fight the next conflict.

An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.
An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

It’s High Time to Prepare for Russia’s Collapse

Not planning for the possibility of disintegration betrays a dangerous lack of imagination.

An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.
An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.

Turkey Is Sending Cold War-Era Cluster Bombs to Ukraine

The artillery-fired cluster munitions could be lethal to Russian troops—and Ukrainian civilians.

A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol  January 8, 2009 in Washington.
A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol January 8, 2009 in Washington.

Congrats, You’re a Member of Congress. Now Listen Up.

Some brief foreign-policy advice for the newest members of the U.S. legislature.