Passport

Switzerland to Muslim Students: Shake Your Teacher’s Hand or Pay $5,000

Two Muslim students who refused to shake their female teacher's hand will be fined $5,000 if they don't do it.

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM - DECEMBER 21: President of Switzerland Simonetta Sommaruga gestures during a press conference after her meeting with President of the European Commission Jean-Claude Juncker and Minister for Foreign and European Affairs Jean Asselborn in Brussels, Belgium on December 21, 2015. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
BRUSSELS, BELGIUM - DECEMBER 21: President of Switzerland Simonetta Sommaruga gestures during a press conference after her meeting with President of the European Commission Jean-Claude Juncker and Minister for Foreign and European Affairs Jean Asselborn in Brussels, Belgium on December 21, 2015. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

When two teenage Muslim students from Syria told their school in Switzerland that to shake their female teacher's hand would violate their religious beliefs, administrators were sympathetic. So they made an exception: Unlike the school's other students, who shake each teacher's hand at the beginning and end of each class period, the two boys would be exempt from shaking anyone's hand at all.

Turns out the Swiss national government takes their handshakes seriously. So seriously, in fact, that a regional authority announced Wednesday that the two boys would shake their female teachers' hands from now on -- or pay a $5,000 fine.  The local education department in Therwil, which is near the city of Basel, said in a statement Wednesday that the final decision was made because "the public interest with respect to equality between men and women and the integration of foreigners significantly outweighs the freedom of religion."

This came after the citizenship process for the teens' family was halted due to the incident. Authorities are now looking into their father's 2001 asylum claim. He is an imam.

When two teenage Muslim students from Syria told their school in Switzerland that to shake their female teacher’s hand would violate their religious beliefs, administrators were sympathetic. So they made an exception: Unlike the school’s other students, who shake each teacher’s hand at the beginning and end of each class period, the two boys would be exempt from shaking anyone’s hand at all.

Turns out the Swiss national government takes their handshakes seriously. So seriously, in fact, that a regional authority announced Wednesday that the two boys would shake their female teachers’ hands from now on — or pay a $5,000 fine.  The local education department in Therwil, which is near the city of Basel, said in a statement Wednesday that the final decision was made because “the public interest with respect to equality between men and women and the integration of foreigners significantly outweighs the freedom of religion.”

This came after the citizenship process for the teens’ family was halted due to the incident. Authorities are now looking into their father’s 2001 asylum claim. He is an imam.

Last month, Swiss Justice Minister Simonetta Sommaruga went on television to say that “the handshake is part of our culture.”

“We cannot accept this in the name of religious freedom,” she said.

There are roughly 350,000 Muslims in Switzerland, and it’s unclear whether other exceptions were quietly made before this one. It’s also unclear what the two boys will do next. In an interview with Swiss media, one said they “could not just delete [their] culture as if it were a hard drive.”

Photo credit: Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

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