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Trump, Who Promises To Win At Everything, Just Lost a Golf Tournament to Mexico

The PGA is moving a marquee event from a Trump course in Florida to Mexico.

GettyImages-465626804
GettyImages-465626804

For 55 straight years, the PGA Tour has been going to Doral, Florida, for an annual tournament. From 1962 until 2006, it visited for the Doral Open. In 2007, it began hosting the World Golf Championship-Cadillac Championship. In 2012, Donald Trump bought the course, renaming it Trump National Doral Miami. Now, four years later, the tournament is slapping the Republican frontrunner in the face and moving it to the country he bashes more than any other: Mexico.

On Wednesday, the PGA confirmed the move, a decision that came after the tour said in January it would reevaluate the future of the tournament because of Trump’s controversial comments about Mexicans and Muslims.

In other words, Trump, who has promised to win at literally everything, just lost a major golf tournament to Mexico.

For 55 straight years, the PGA Tour has been going to Doral, Florida, for an annual tournament. From 1962 until 2006, it visited for the Doral Open. In 2007, it began hosting the World Golf Championship-Cadillac Championship. In 2012, Donald Trump bought the course, renaming it Trump National Doral Miami. Now, four years later, the tournament is slapping the Republican frontrunner in the face and moving it to the country he bashes more than any other: Mexico.

On Wednesday, the PGA confirmed the move, a decision that came after the tour said in January it would reevaluate the future of the tournament because of Trump’s controversial comments about Mexicans and Muslims.

In other words, Trump, who has promised to win at literally everything, just lost a major golf tournament to Mexico.

The PGA confirmed the move Wednesday, without yet giving a reason why the event was relocated.

The Miami Herald reported Wednesday that the move was made because the tour couldn’t find a sponsor to replace Cadillac.

But Trump made clear, on Tuesday evening and again on Wednesday, that he believed the tour pulled out due to his controversial policies toward Mexicans. Speaking on Sean Hannity’s Fox News show Tuesday night, he said, “They’re moving it to Mexico City which, by the way, I hope they have kidnapping insurance. But they’re moving it to Mexico City. And I’m saying, you know, what’s going on here? It is so sad when you look at what’s going on with our country.”

On Wednesday, his campaign released a statement elaborating on these comments.

“No different than Nabisco, Carrier and so many other American companies, the PGA Tour has put profit ahead of thousands of American jobs, millions of dollars in revenue for local communities and charities and the enjoyment of hundreds of thousands of fans who make the tournament an annual tradition,” Trump said. “This decision only further embodies the very reason I am running for President of the United States.”

Photo credit: SAM GREENWOOD/Getty Images

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