Argument

An expert's point of view on a current event.

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, June 6, 2016

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Arzu Geybulla profiles her friend Khadija Ismayilova, Azerbaijan’s most fearless journalist and one of the world’s best-known dissidents. Robert Looney argues that democracies are proving better than authoritarian states at dealing with climate change. Jeanne Bourgault explains why, for refugees, ...

GettyImages-534837436 crop
GettyImages-534837436 crop

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Arzu Geybulla profiles her friend Khadija Ismayilova, Azerbaijan’s most fearless journalist and one of the world’s best-known dissidents.

Robert Looney argues that democracies are proving better than authoritarian states at dealing with climate change.

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Arzu Geybulla profiles her friend Khadija Ismayilova, Azerbaijan’s most fearless journalist and one of the world’s best-known dissidents.

Robert Looney argues that democracies are proving better than authoritarian states at dealing with climate change.

Jeanne Bourgault explains why, for refugees, access to reliable information is a matter of life and death.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

For Foreign Policy, Sebastian Rotella tells the remarkable story of a Guatemalan technocrat who set out to tackle government corruption — and barely made it out alive.

The BBC’s Rana Jawad reports on how Tunisia’s Truth and Dignity Commission is working to find justice for victims of the old dictatorship.

The New York Times’ Nicholas Fandos reports on the financial struggles of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, which coordinated the Panama Papers leak. (In case you missed it, Drew Sullivan recently made the case for more robust funding of investigative journalism in Democracy Lab.)

Reporting from the Oslo Freedom Forum, the Economist argues that the Arab Spring continues online despite widespread repression.

In the Guardian, Rachel Aspden tells the story of a 15-year-old girl caught in the violent 2013 clearing of the Rabaa protest camp in Cairo.

RFE/RL’s Charles Recknagel covers Putin’s latest attempt — this time in Greece — to undermine European unity on extending anti-Russian sanctions.

For Foreign Affairs, Isaac Webb explains why Ukraine’s prosecution of mid-level Russian officers for waging “aggressive war” is a miscarriage of justice.

NewsDeeply’s Preethi Nallu provides a round-up of the site’s coverage from the just-concluded World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul.

And if you’re in Washington D.C. tonight, check out a free event, hosted by the American Bar Association, on how the process of writing a constitution can improve prospects for democracy.

In the photo, Russian President Vladimir Putin visits the monastic community of Mount Athos in Karyes, Greece, on May 28. 

Photo credit: -/AFP/Getty Images

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