Argument

An expert's point of view on a current event.

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, June 13, 2016

 To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Jan Rydzak explains why Poland’s new counterterrorism law poses a grave threat to Internet freedom — and not just in Poland. Richard Cockett reports on how Aung San Suu Kyi’s new democratic government in Burma is failing to address the ...

GettyImages-532080528 crop
GettyImages-532080528 crop

 To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Jan Rydzak explains why Poland’s new counterterrorism law poses a grave threat to Internet freedom -- and not just in Poland.

Richard Cockett reports on how Aung San Suu Kyi’s new democratic government in Burma is failing to address the suffering of the beleaguered Rohingya minority.

 To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Jan Rydzak explains why Poland’s new counterterrorism law poses a grave threat to Internet freedom — and not just in Poland.

Richard Cockett reports on how Aung San Suu Kyi’s new democratic government in Burma is failing to address the suffering of the beleaguered Rohingya minority.

Tarek Megerisi warns of the danger Libya’s new warlord poses to the country’s fragile unity government.

Philip N. Howard argues that the world’s great cities need to introduce privacy safeguards as they make greater use of data gathered from physical objects.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

Financial Times’ Henry Foy reports that Poland’s right-wing government wants to roll back the country’s market economy.

Politico Magazine’s Ann Louise Bardach reports that Fidel Castro is resisting reforms in the wake of President Obama’s historic visit to Cuba.

The Wall Street Journal’s Ruchir Sharma makes the case that autocrats aren’t actually better at producing economic growth.

In Foreign Affairs, Sonia Paul scrutinizes censorship in Uganda.

For Lenny, Lauren Bohn interviews four Syrian women who have become their families’ breadwinners.

In South African Crime Quarterly, Hennie van Vuuren describes an epidemic of petty corruption that’s plaguing the country.

Foreign Policy’s Ian Bateson reports on the Ukrainian military pilot Nadiya Savchenko, whose recent release from Russian captivity has turned her into a major political player in her home country.

In the National Interest, Maximilien von Berg marks the unhappy 25th birthday of Somaliland, an island of stability in the failed state of Somalia that still has not achieved international recognition.

And finally, if you’re in Washington D.C. tomorrow, check out a panel discussion hosted by the Center for Transatlantic Relations about how civic activism can reinvigorate struggling democracies.

In the photo, people celebrate the independence day of Somalia’s breakaway territory of Somaliland in the capital, Hargeisa, on May 18.

Photo credit: MOHAMED ABDIWAHAB/AFP/Getty Images

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