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These Charts Show The Generals Erdogan Has Purged

The U.S. military’s highest-ranking officer arrived in Turkey hoping to mend the raw feelings left by this month’s failed against the civilian-led government in Ankara. Instead, Gen. Joseph Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, found protesters outside the American embassy holding signs saying “Get Out Coup Plotter Dunford” and “Dunford go home. ...

Members of Patriotic Party shout slogans and hold banners and placards as they march in front of the US embassy in Ankara of August 1, 2016 during a protest against the visit of American General Joseph Dunford, chairman of the US joint chiefs of staff. 
Turkey's military and political leaders were to meet on July 1 in Ankara with the top US military commander in the first direct talks since last month's failed coup. General Joseph Dunford, chairman of the US joint chiefs of staff, will meet with Turkish chief of staff General Hulusi Akar and Prime Minister Binali Yildirim in the Turkish capital.
Tensions between the two NATO allies have been aggravated by the foiled July 15 putsch by rogue elements in the military who sought to bring down the government of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.
 / AFP / ADEM ALTAN        (Photo credit should read ADEM ALTAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of Patriotic Party shout slogans and hold banners and placards as they march in front of the US embassy in Ankara of August 1, 2016 during a protest against the visit of American General Joseph Dunford, chairman of the US joint chiefs of staff. Turkey's military and political leaders were to meet on July 1 in Ankara with the top US military commander in the first direct talks since last month's failed coup. General Joseph Dunford, chairman of the US joint chiefs of staff, will meet with Turkish chief of staff General Hulusi Akar and Prime Minister Binali Yildirim in the Turkish capital. Tensions between the two NATO allies have been aggravated by the foiled July 15 putsch by rogue elements in the military who sought to bring down the government of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. / AFP / ADEM ALTAN (Photo credit should read ADEM ALTAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of Patriotic Party shout slogans and hold banners and placards as they march in front of the US embassy in Ankara of August 1, 2016 during a protest against the visit of American General Joseph Dunford, chairman of the US joint chiefs of staff. Turkey's military and political leaders were to meet on July 1 in Ankara with the top US military commander in the first direct talks since last month's failed coup. General Joseph Dunford, chairman of the US joint chiefs of staff, will meet with Turkish chief of staff General Hulusi Akar and Prime Minister Binali Yildirim in the Turkish capital. Tensions between the two NATO allies have been aggravated by the foiled July 15 putsch by rogue elements in the military who sought to bring down the government of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. / AFP / ADEM ALTAN (Photo credit should read ADEM ALTAN/AFP/Getty Images)

The U.S. military’s highest-ranking officer arrived in Turkey hoping to mend the raw feelings left by this month’s failed against the civilian-led government in Ankara.

Instead, Gen. Joseph Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, found protesters outside the American embassy holding signs saying “Get Out Coup Plotter Dunford” and "Dunford go home. Send us Fethullah," a reference to U.S.-based cleric Fethullah Gulen, who the Turkish government accuses of plotting the coup attempt and wants sent back for trial.

The protests come only days after a firestorm erupted when the head of U.S. Central Command, Gen. Joseph Votel, expressed concern about the Turkish military’s ongoing purge of thousands of officers and enlisted personnel.

The U.S. military’s highest-ranking officer arrived in Turkey hoping to mend the raw feelings left by this month’s failed against the civilian-led government in Ankara.

Instead, Gen. Joseph Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, found protesters outside the American embassy holding signs saying “Get Out Coup Plotter Dunford” and “Dunford go home. Send us Fethullah,” a reference to U.S.-based cleric Fethullah Gulen, who the Turkish government accuses of plotting the coup attempt and wants sent back for trial.

The protests come only days after a firestorm erupted when the head of U.S. Central Command, Gen. Joseph Votel, expressed concern about the Turkish military’s ongoing purge of thousands of officers and enlisted personnel.

Here are two charts showing who in the Turkish military has been given the boot.

 

Turkish Air Force 2

Turkish Air Force 2

 

Images from the Institute for the Study of War.

Photo Credit: ADEM ALTAN/AFP/Getty Images

Tag: Turkey

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