Feature

Five Years of the New Tunisia

From revolution to disillusionment and back again: milestones on Tunisia’s rocky path to democracy.

Thousnads of demonstrators gather at the Kasba in Tunis on Febuary 25, 2011. Tens of thousands of Tunisians rallied today to demand the resignation of Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi's transitional government set up after last month's ouster of Zine el Abidine Ben Ali. AFP PHOTO / BORNI Hichem (Photo credit should read BORNI Hichem/AFP/Getty Images)
Thousnads of demonstrators gather at the Kasba in Tunis on Febuary 25, 2011. Tens of thousands of Tunisians rallied today to demand the resignation of Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi's transitional government set up after last month's ouster of Zine el Abidine Ben Ali. AFP PHOTO / BORNI Hichem (Photo credit should read BORNI Hichem/AFP/Getty Images)

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In 2010 and 2011, thousands of Tunisians took to the streets. They toppled a president and ushered in a new era of democracy. Look below to see what happened next.

Photo credit: BORNI HICHEM/AFP/Getty Images

Read more from Tunisia: In Sun and Shadow:
Tunisia’s Glorious Confusion:The dawn of democracy is something to root for — but the forces that have pulled the other Arab Spring countries back into upheaval still threaten to undo its progress.
Tunisia’s Dying Jazz: New freedoms have brought art and religion into conflict, threatening to crush a tradition trapped in the middle.
Trouble in the Wild East: The border town of Ben Guerdane is a haven for smugglers. Locals would like to keep it that way.
The Mainstreaming of Tunisia’s Islamists: The Ennahda Party’s latest moves put its political astuteness on show once again.
Terms of Abuse: On paper, Tunisia’s revolution has boosted legal protections for women. Yet the reality is starkly different.

C.K. Hickey is the interactives and features designer at Foreign Policy.

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