Podcast

Syria Is Now Everyone’s War

With more than a million refugees in Europe, the spread of conflict throughout the region, and Russia’s involvement — why what’s happening in Syria matters everywhere.

On this episode of The E.R., Max Boot joins us to discuss his new book "The Road Not Taken."
On this episode of The E.R., Max Boot joins us to discuss his new book "The Road Not Taken."

On this week’s episode of The E.R., FP’s David Rothkopf, Lara Jakes, Kori Schake, and Al Arabiya’s Hisham Melhem dig deep into the war in Syria and why the conflict no longer affects merely one country or even the whole Middle East region — but much of the world.

The panel debates the infamous “red line” and takes a critical look at the policies of President Barack Obama’s administration in the region — from its inaction and lack of military force to the troubling involvement of Russia, Turkey, and Iran. The war that has lasted five years has wrought dire humanitarian, political, economic, and military consequences, and those problems have spilled over into the region and throughout Europe, now involving dozens of countries, NATO, and humanitarian organizations.

The panel also looks to the future of the region and makes a slew of Syria-related policy suggestions for the next president — first and foremost, protecting civilian lives and enlisting more cooperation from other Middle Eastern countries. But, some on the panel worry, since the United States has essentially lost all credibility by imposing nonintervention as a policy in Syria, where does the next administration go from here?

On this week’s episode of The E.R., FP’s David Rothkopf, Lara Jakes, Kori Schake, and Al Arabiya’s Hisham Melhem dig deep into the war in Syria and why the conflict no longer affects merely one country or even the whole Middle East region — but much of the world.

The panel debates the infamous “red line” and takes a critical look at the policies of President Barack Obama’s administration in the region — from its inaction and lack of military force to the troubling involvement of Russia, Turkey, and Iran. The war that has lasted five years has wrought dire humanitarian, political, economic, and military consequences, and those problems have spilled over into the region and throughout Europe, now involving dozens of countries, NATO, and humanitarian organizations.

The panel also looks to the future of the region and makes a slew of Syria-related policy suggestions for the next president — first and foremost, protecting civilian lives and enlisting more cooperation from other Middle Eastern countries. But, some on the panel worry, since the United States has essentially lost all credibility by imposing nonintervention as a policy in Syria, where does the next administration go from here?

Hisham Melhem is a columnist and analyst for Al Arabiya News Channel in Washington, D.C. He is also a correspondent for the Lebanese daily Annahar. Follow him on Twitter at: @hisham_melhem.

Kori Schake is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, where she focuses on military history, and is a former foreign-policy advisor to Sen. John McCain. Follow her on Twitter at: @KoriSchake.

Lara Jakes is FP’s managing editor for news. Follow her on Twitter at: @larajakesFP.

David Rothkopf is the CEO and editor of the FP Group. Follow him on Twitter at: @djrothkopf.

Subscribe to FP’s The E.R. and Global Thinkers podcasts on iTunes.

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