Argument

An expert's point of view on a current event.

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, September 26, 2016

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.  Tunisia’s former president, Mohamed Moncef Marzouki, argues that the country’s ruling coalition doesn’t really represent its people. Ilya Lozovsky sees signs of hope for Ukrainian democracy in the country’s maturing civil society. Robert Looney warns that Algeria is running out ...

gettyimages-607235724-crop
gettyimages-607235724-crop

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. 

Tunisia’s former president, Mohamed Moncef Marzouki, argues that the country’s ruling coalition doesn’t really represent its people.

Ilya Lozovsky sees signs of hope for Ukrainian democracy in the country’s maturing civil society.

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. 

Tunisia’s former president, Mohamed Moncef Marzouki, argues that the country’s ruling coalition doesn’t really represent its people.

Ilya Lozovsky sees signs of hope for Ukrainian democracy in the country’s maturing civil society.

Robert Looney warns that Algeria is running out of time to reform its economy.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

Yesterday, as reported by Radul Radovanovic for the Associated Press, Bosnian Serbs held a referendum — declared illegal by the country’s constitutional court — that threatens to upend a peace that has held since the Dayton Accords. Judy Dempsey writes for Carnegie Europe about growing concern that the Balkans are “drifting backward.”

The Monkey Cage’s Kim Yi Dionne interviews Adrienne LeBas about growing protests in Zimbabwe, where 92-year-old president Robert Mugabe is reaching the end of his rule. (A detailed report written by LeBas for the Center for Strategic Intelligence Research provides additional context.)

For Latin America Goes Global, Christopher Sabatini explains the latest developments in the Venezuelan opposition’s attempt to remove the unpopular President Maduro through a referendum.

In the Conversation, Brian Grodsky argues that it’s time to get U.S. democracy assistance back on track (and there’s more in his new book).

In the Atlantic, Sheila Coronel charts the rise of Rodrigo Duterte, the Philippines’ bellicose new president.

In Foreign Affairs, Dennis Sammut and Joseph D’Urso welcome Georgia’s pivot towards the West — and explain why it wasn’t inevitable.

Writing for Global Voices, Afef Abrougui explains how the United Arab Emirates has managed to avoid its own Arab Spring.

In the Atlantic Council’s “New Atlanticist” blog, Melinda Haring and Kateryna Smagliy offer 10 suggestions for the United States’ new ambassador to Ukraine.

For the Global Anticorruption Blog, Maggie Murphy introduces a new database that will track dozens of anti-corruption commitments made at the London Anticorruption Summit in May.

In the photo, protesters demand electoral reforms in Zimbabwe’s second-largest city, Bulawayo, September 17.

Photo credit: ZINYANGE AUNTONY/AFP/Getty Images

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