How Much Can Russia Mess With the U.S. Elections?

If Vladimir Putin really is behind the hacks of the DNC and Clinton campaign, it could mark the frightening beginning of a new cyber-era of election tampering.

On this episode of The E.R., Max Boot joins us to discuss his new book "The Road Not Taken."
On this episode of The E.R., Max Boot joins us to discuss his new book "The Road Not Taken."
On this episode of The E.R., Max Boot joins us to discuss his new book "The Road Not Taken."

On this week’s episode of The E.R., David Rothkopf, Kori Schake, David Sanger of the New York Times, and the BBC’s Kim Ghattas discuss recent cyberattacks on the Democratic National Committee, what vulnerabilities the U.S. election system has, and what the threat of cyberattacks could mean for the credibility of the upcoming presidential election. And though the U.S. government has yet to name the source of the hacks of the DNC and Hillary Clinton’s campaign, all eyes are on Russia.

How is the United States prepared to counterattack if Russian intelligence continues to meddle in U.S. political affairs?

The panel talks about ways the United States can (and should) ward against cyberattacks, including greater public transparency and fixes to shore up U.S. national and state networks. But how big is the cybersecurity threat really — from Russia, China, or even North Korea? And is there enough time and infrastructure in place to do what might be necessary before the November election?

On this week’s episode of The E.R., David Rothkopf, Kori Schake, David Sanger of the New York Times, and the BBC’s Kim Ghattas discuss recent cyberattacks on the Democratic National Committee, what vulnerabilities the U.S. election system has, and what the threat of cyberattacks could mean for the credibility of the upcoming presidential election. And though the U.S. government has yet to name the source of the hacks of the DNC and Hillary Clinton’s campaign, all eyes are on Russia.

How is the United States prepared to counterattack if Russian intelligence continues to meddle in U.S. political affairs?

The panel talks about ways the United States can (and should) ward against cyberattacks, including greater public transparency and fixes to shore up U.S. national and state networks. But how big is the cybersecurity threat really — from Russia, China, or even North Korea? And is there enough time and infrastructure in place to do what might be necessary before the November election?

Kim Ghattas is a correspondent for the BBC, covering Hillary Clinton’s 2016 campaign, and an FP columnist. She was previously based in Beirut, reporting on the Middle East for 10 years, and is the author of The Secretary: A Journey With Hillary Clinton From Beirut to the Heart of American Power. Follow her on Twitter at: @BBCKimGhattas.

David Sanger is the national security correspondent for the New York Times and author of Confront and Conceal: Obama’s Secret Wars and Surprising Use of American Power. Follow him on Twitter at: @SangerNYT.

Kori Schake is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, where she focuses on military history, and a former foreign-policy advisor to Sen. John McCain. Follow her on Twitter at: @KoriSchake.

David Rothkopf is the CEO and editor of the FP Group. Follow him on Twitter at: @djrothkopf.

Subscribe to FP’s The E.R. and Global Thinkers podcasts on iTunes.

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