Could America Get Even Uglier?

Racism, nativism, and anti-Semitism are disturbingly apparent in this year’s presidential race. But what comes after November 8 could disrupt American democracy itself.

FP_podcast_article_artwork-1-globalthinkers
FP_podcast_article_artwork-1-globalthinkers

On this week’s episode of The E.R., FP’s David Rothkopf, Rosa Brooks, Julia Ioffe, and the Financial Times’s Ed Luce look past election day at whether America’s democracy and values can survive this brutal campaign. The panel discusses the lasting effects of a toxic race that could haunt our country for years to come – even if Donald Trump loses.

From the extreme nationalism to racism, from anti-Semitism to complete disregard for the law, 2016’s election cycle will go down in history. But is this nasty rhetoric and deep-rooted anger going to become the norm for future campaigns? Will the Republican Party find their footing again once the election is over?

Perhaps even more disturbing, from a foreign-policy perspective, is Russia’s involvement in the U.S. election. With calls from Trump praising Russian President Vladimir Putin to the now-confirmed hacks into the DNC and Clinton campaign by Russian intelligence, is the Kremlin really that dangerous or will its adventurism backfire?

On this week’s episode of The E.R., FP’s David Rothkopf, Rosa Brooks, Julia Ioffe, and the Financial Times’s Ed Luce look past election day at whether America’s democracy and values can survive this brutal campaign. The panel discusses the lasting effects of a toxic race that could haunt our country for years to come – even if Donald Trump loses.

From the extreme nationalism to racism, from anti-Semitism to complete disregard for the law, 2016’s election cycle will go down in history. But is this nasty rhetoric and deep-rooted anger going to become the norm for future campaigns? Will the Republican Party find their footing again once the election is over?

Perhaps even more disturbing, from a foreign-policy perspective, is Russia’s involvement in the U.S. election. With calls from Trump praising Russian President Vladimir Putin to the now-confirmed hacks into the DNC and Clinton campaign by Russian intelligence, is the Kremlin really that dangerous or will its adventurism backfire?

Rosa Brooks is a senior fellow at the New America Foundation and teaches international law, national security, and constitutional law at Georgetown University. She is the author of the newly released book “How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything.” Follow her on Twitter at: @brooks_rosa.

Julia Ioffe is a Voice columnist at FP and a contributing writer for Politico and Highline. Follow her on Twitter at: @juliaioffe.

Ed Luce is the Financial Times’s chief U.S. commentator and columnist based in Washington, D.C. Follow him on Twitter at: @EdwardGLuce.

David Rothkopf is the CEO and editor of the FP Group. Follow him on Twitter at: @djrothkopf.

Subscribe to FP’s The E.R. and Global Thinkers podcasts on iTunes.

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