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The Ghosts of Servers Past Haunt Clinton … Again

Less than a week and who knows how many more emails to go.

By , a global affairs journalist and the author of The Influence of Soros and Bad Jews, and , a diplomacy and national security reporter at Foreign Policy.
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The State Department released another batch of Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s emails on Thursday afternoon.

Approximately 350 documents totaling 1,250 pages of emails were released, according to the State Department. There’s details of the 2011 announcement of the interim Libyan cabinet, a speech to the Haiti Donors Conference, scads of articles forwarded by Sidney Blumenthal, and details of the many ways in which Huma Abedin manages Hillary Clinton’s travel schedule, fax machine, and printing things. Also, John Podesta, who as we now know puts everything in writing, slammed David Axelrod in 2010 for caving to the right wing on economic principles.

The State Department also said it would produce an additional unspecified amount of materials on Friday.

The State Department released another batch of Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s emails on Thursday afternoon.

Approximately 350 documents totaling 1,250 pages of emails were released, according to the State Department. There’s details of the 2011 announcement of the interim Libyan cabinet, a speech to the Haiti Donors Conference, scads of articles forwarded by Sidney Blumenthal, and details of the many ways in which Huma Abedin manages Hillary Clinton’s travel schedule, fax machine, and printing things. Also, John Podesta, who as we now know puts everything in writing, slammed David Axelrod in 2010 for caving to the right wing on economic principles.

The State Department also said it would produce an additional unspecified amount of materials on Friday.

This is, of course, not the only recent piece of Hillary Clinton email news. On Oct. 28, the FBI announced to Congress it would looking into emails found on serial sexter (and former congressman) Anthony Weiner’s computer for information pertinent to the previous Clinton email investigation that was closed last July. A Marquette Law School poll released Wednesday reported that 60 percent of voters are bothered “a lot” by Clinton’s email October surprise, up from 50 percent before the news broke.

FBI Director James Comey has come under fire for his decision to reopen the investigation. Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid penned an Oct. 31 letter informing Comey he may have violated the Hatch Act, with prevents federal employees from using authority to influence an election. Reid also needled Comey for failing to pursue what the senior senator hinted was an ongoing FBI inquiry into nefarious ties between Donald Trump and Russia — a claim that media outlets have both confirmed and denied.

Anonymous FBI sources told Fox News that the bureau’s investigation of the Clinton Foundation would “likely” move toward an indictment. The sources did not specify a timeline.

Not to be outdone, WikiLeaks also released still more John Podesta emails Thursday. Some of them contained substantive information — for example, how Hillary Clinton was prepared to answer for her past comments on “super predators.” Some of the emails, however, were far more underwhelming — including how much campaign Communications Director Jennifer Palmieri loves her own ads.

Photo credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Emily Tamkin is a global affairs journalist and the author of The Influence of Soros and Bad Jews. Twitter: @emilyctamkin

Robbie Gramer is a diplomacy and national security reporter at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @RobbieGramer

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